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CHAPTER 1: Getting the Right Gear
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To get razor-sharp shots at night and in other situations that call for a slow shutter speed, you need to mount your camera on a tripod. Almost all digital cameras except the cheap plastic ones have the necessary screw threads for attaching the camera to a tripod. But some manufacturers are more thoughtful about this feature than others. If the battery chamber or memory card slot is on the bottom of the camera, you may not be able to swap out either component without removing the camera from the tripod. Tr s annoying especially if you run out of battery power or memory after you just spent a long time framing the perfect shot.
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Lighting Solutions
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One of the most important things you can do to enhance your photography is to learn to assess and control lighting. Lighting is critical to a properly exposed photo, of course, but good photographers also use light to set a mood, emphasize important aspects of a scene, and play down distracting or unattractive elements. When you re shooting outdoors in the daytime, too much light is sometimes a problem. 6 discusses some ways to deal with this situation. More often, though, you need to bring more light to a scene. You can use a number of lighting tools to do so, from your camera s built-in flash to powerful, studio-style lights. The following sections introduce you to these lighting solutions.
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To get a basic education in lighting, fire up your web browser and click over to www.webphotoschool.com. This online learning center offers several free lighting lessons. For $60, you can get a year s access to dozens of additional lessons; a one-month membership is just $20.
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The small flash unit on your camera is supposed to allow you to take pictures in a darkened room or at night. But the light from a built-in flash is so narrowly focused that it doesn t serve well as a sole light source. Pictures taken with a built-in flash usually show a small, bright blast of light, with rapid falloff to shadows around the perimeter of the shot. See Page 24 of the color insert for an example of this effect. Built-in flash usually causes red-eye in indoor and nighttime portrait pictures, too.
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Ironically, a built-in flash is most useful for shooting outdoors in daylight. Strong sun can produce shadows on a subject, and the small pop of light produced by a built-in flash is the perfect way to eliminate those shadows. Page 12 of the color insert offers an example of this technique.
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Reflectors
A reflector is a thin, flat panel that has a light-reflecting surface. It acts like a mirror of sorts, reflecting any light that strikes it. The left image in Figure 1.4 shows an assortment of portable fabric reflectors from Photoflex (www.photoflex.com).
(Photo courtesy Photoflex Inc.)
FIGURE 1.4 Collapsible reflectors are great for traveling photographers because you can fold them up and slip them inside a small carrying bag.
Reflectors come in handy for eliminating shadows in a scene. For example, in the portrait series featured on pages 8 and 9 of the color insert, I positioned my subject next to a window. I wanted the daylight shining through that window to serve as the main light source. But because the light was coming from a single direction, one half of the face was in the shadows. I positioned a reflector opposite the window to bounce light back onto the shadowed side of the face. (See 3 for more information about portrait lighting.) You don t need to buy a commercially-made reflector to use this technique a piece of white cardboard will do. Those foil-covered windshield shades that you use to keep your car cool in summer also make good reflectors. These solutions are a little cumbersome for traveling photographers, however, which is why I prefer collapsible commercial reflectors like those shown in Figure 1.4. You can fold up these reflectors and slip them inside a small carrying case, as shown on the right side of the figure.
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