barcode dll for vb net 6: Getting the Tough Shot: Low-Light and Action Photography in Software

Draw Code 128B in Software 6: Getting the Tough Shot: Low-Light and Action Photography

CHAPTER 6: Getting the Tough Shot: Low-Light and Action Photography
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Some advanced digital cameras have a built-in neutral density filter that serves the same purpose as a real lens filter. Usually, the filter works only when you select a slow shutter speed.
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Understanding Neutral Density Filters
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Neutral density filters reduce light transmission to enable you to use a slower shutter speed or larger aperture in bright light without overexposing your image. These filters come in varying strengths, which are indicated by a density number. Density numbers typically range from .10 to 4.00, with a higher number indicating more light reduction. As with close-up lenses, you can stack neutral density filters to enjoy their combined light-reducing strength. I used a single filter with a density number of .6 for my waterfall image in Figure 6.8. You may also see ND filters rated in terms of filter factor. As explained in 1, this value indicates how much increase in exposure is required to produce the same image that you would get without the filter. Again, just remember that the higher the number, whether it s density number or filter factor, the more you reduce the light entering your camera. The .6 ND filter that I added for the waterfall photo has a filter factor of 4X, meaning that you need four times the light to get the same exposure with the filter as without.
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Freezing Action with a Fast Shutter
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If your photo collection is like most, it contains scads of images that were unintentionally blurred because the subject moved too fast for the camera to capture clearly. You may as well go ahead and toss those pictures, as I do, because no amount of fiddling in a photo editor can fix them. For future pictures, follow these guidelines to freeze a subject in motion:
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Switch to shutter-priority AE or manual exposure, if available on your camera,
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so that you can match the shutter speed to the pace of your subject. Until you get a feel for the shutter-to-action relationship, you ll need to experiment to find the right setting. For the subject featured in Figure 6.9, for example, a shutter speed of 1/20 second was much too slow; 1/60 second nearly stopped the action, but some blurring was still visible around the hands, feet, and bottom of the shirt. At 1/125 second, my young friend appears cleanly suspended in mid-jump. You can see the color version of these images on Page 7 of the color insert.
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Shoot Like a Pro!
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1/20 second 1/60 second 1/125 second
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FIGURE 6.9 Match shutter speed to the pace of your subject. Here, a shutter speed of 1/125 second froze the jumper cleanly in mid-air in the far-right photo.
Don t forget that you must add more light as your raise shutter speed, either by shifting to a larger aperture (lower f-stop number) or by increasing the power of whatever artificial light source you may be using. Otherwise, your image will get progressively darker.
If your camera doesn t offer manual shutter control or shutter-priority AE, but it
does provide aperture-priority AE, you can increase shutter speed by shifting to a lower f-stop. Doing so opens the aperture and lets in more light, which causes the camera to increase shutter speed in response.
No way to control either aperture or shutter speed Check to see whether your
camera offers a sports or action scene mode. This mode automatically shifts your camera to a higher shutter speed.
Speeding Up Your Camera s Response Time
Although many digital cameras offer shutter speeds high enough to capture just about any moving subject, some other camera functions can slow you down. Try these tricks to kick your camera into a higher gear:
CHAPTER 6: Getting the Tough Shot: Low-Light and Action Photography
On most models, you must wait for the camera to write the current image to the
memory card before you can take a second picture. Even when this lag time is brief, it can cause you to miss a great shot when you re shooting action. To keep the lag time as short as possible, use the lowest resolution setting that will produce the quality and picture size that you need. The more pixels the camera captures, the longer it takes to write the picture to the camera s memory card.
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