barcode dll for vb net Technical Aside in Software

Printing Code-128 in Software Technical Aside

Technical Aside
Scanning Code 128 Code Set B In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Code 128A Maker In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create Code 128A image in Software applications.
Measuring Degrees of Color
Code 128 Reader In None
Using Barcode reader for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Code 128A Generator In C#
Using Barcode encoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Code 128A image in .NET applications.
Named for a Victorian-era scientist (Baron Kelvin of Largs, born William Thomson), the Kelvin scale is a thermodynamic temperature scale. On the Kelvin scale, the zero point is what scientists refer to as absolute zero, which translates to 273.15 degrees on the Celsius temperature scale. The importance of all this to photographers is that the colors emitted by various light sources have been plotted on the Kelvin scale, enabling us to describe light in specific terms. The science behind the concept is complex, but the gist involves a black object called a black body that radiates different colors as it is heated. When photographers speak about the color temperature of a light source, they re referring to the Kelvin temperature at which the black body emits the same color as that light. Light sources that you encounter on a daily basis range from about 2000 to 8000 kelvin. (The scientific community decided in the late 1960s that we shouldn t use the word degree or the degree symbol when discussing this temperature scale just kelvin or K.) Toward the low end of the color temperature range, light emits a reddish cast. As temperature increases, the light color changes, moving from yellow to white to blue. Discussions of color temperature can be confusing because photographers use the terms warm and cool to describe actual photo colors. Warm indicates a reddish color,
Code 128 Printer In VS .NET
Using Barcode printer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 128B image in ASP.NET applications.
Drawing Code 128B In VS .NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in .NET framework applications.
Shoot Like a Pro!
Code 128A Generator In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode encoder for .NET framework Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set A image in .NET applications.
Bar Code Encoder In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
Technical Aside
Draw Barcode In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create bar code image in Software applications.
GTIN - 128 Encoder In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create GS1-128 image in Software applications.
Measuring Degrees of Color (continued)
Data Matrix Creation In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Software applications.
Code 39 Drawer In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create Code 3 of 9 image in Software applications.
and cool refers to a bluish tone. It seems backwards that a light source with a high temperature adds a cool color cast to a scene, and vice versa, but that s what happens. In practical terms, you don t need to worry about the Kelvin temperature of a light source you just need to know what color cast to expect. Use the chart on Page 26 of the color insert as your guide.
USPS Intelligent Mail Creator In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create 4-State Customer Barcode image in Software applications.
Making Code 39 Full ASCII In None
Using Barcode creation for Microsoft Excel Control to generate, create Code 39 image in Office Excel applications.
Warming Image Colors
Painting Barcode In Objective-C
Using Barcode maker for iPad Control to generate, create bar code image in iPad applications.
Linear 1D Barcode Printer In Visual C#
Using Barcode drawer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create 1D image in .NET framework applications.
In photography lingo, the term warm colors refers to hues in the red-to-yellow range. Cool tones refers to hues in the blue-to-green range. As discussed earlier in this chapter, you can add warmth to image colors by switching to a white-balance setting that s appropriate for a light source with a higher color temperature than the actual light source for example, using the cloudy or overcast setting to capture a subject lit by household incandescent bulbs. (Your camera s LCD monitor will reflect the color changes as you shift the white-balance setting, so you don t need to be a student of light temperatures to use this trick.) If fiddling with white balance doesn t produce the warming effect you re after, try these alternative techniques:
Matrix Barcode Creation In Java
Using Barcode generator for Java Control to generate, create 2D Barcode image in Java applications.
2D Barcode Printer In .NET Framework
Using Barcode maker for .NET framework Control to generate, create Matrix 2D Barcode image in VS .NET applications.
Go the traditional route and place a warming filter over your camera lens. These
Read Barcode In .NET Framework
Using Barcode reader for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
Making European Article Number 13 In Objective-C
Using Barcode maker for iPhone Control to generate, create EAN13 image in iPhone applications.
filters cut down on the amount of blue in the light and give your image a rosy cast, as illustrated by the top right image on Page 27 of the color insert. Although warming filters are most often used to warm skin tones in portraits, as I did for the last image on Page 12 of the insert, I also sometimes use them in scenic shots to approximate the light that you get around sunrise and sunset the so-called golden hours for photography. The top right image on Page 27 shows an example. Warming filters, like other color filters, are available in different strengths; for both example pictures, I used an 81B filter, which indicates a medium-impact filter.
After you take a shot with a warming filter (or any filter, for that matter), review the image on your LCD monitor to double-check the exposure. If your camera uses through-the-lens (TTL) exposure metering and you re working in autoexposure mode, the camera should automatically adjust exposure to account for the filter. If not, you
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.