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fd; input, output;
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door_arg_t arg; fd = Open (argv[1], O_RDWR); /* open the door */
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/* set up input arguments and pointer to the result */ input = atol (argv[2]); arg.data_ptr = (char *) &input; /* pointer to input */ arg.data_size = sizeof(long); arg.desc_ptr = NULL; arg.desc_num = 0; /* size of data argument */
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Remote Procedure Call (RPC)
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18 19 20 21 22 23 24 } arg.rbuf = (char *) &output; arg.rsize = sizeof (long) /* pointer to the output */
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/* number of bytes for the result */ */
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/* call the server function and print result Door_call (fd, &arg); printf ( "The result is : %1d\n", output); exit (0);
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Open the Door In line 12, the door is opened by calling the library function Open(). It takes as an argument the pathname specified at the command line when the client program is started. It returns a door descriptor. Set Up the Input Parameters and a Pointer to the Output
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In lines 13 19, the arg structure contains a pointer to the inputs and a pointer to the result. The member data_ptr of the structure arg points to the first byte of input data, and data_size specifies the number bytes in the input data. The two members desc_ptr and desc_num deal with passing descriptors. These two members are not very important for our discussion here. rbuf points to the first byte of the result buffer, and rsize is its size.
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Call the Server Function and Print the Result In lines 22 24, the server function is called by invoking the Door_call () function, specifying as arguments the door descriptor and the pointer to the arguments structure. When the function returns, an output variable will have the result, which we print using a printf statement. After the client program is compiled and linked to produce an executable called client1, the client program is started in a separate window using the following command line with the same pathname argument we passed to the server:
solaris % client1 /tmp/server1 3
The result is 27.
Doors Process
In Doors, one application makes a function available to other applications running on the same machine by creating a door. The application providing the function is considered a service provider and is called a server. The other applications using the function are considered service consumers and are called clients. Inside the server, each door is identified
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by a descriptor. Inside the clients, doors are identified by paths much like ordinary files. A server creates a door by calling the door_create() function. The first argument of this function is an address of a callback function associated with that door. The return value of door_create() is the descriptor of the new door. Next, the server calls fattach() to associate a door with a pathname. The client opens a door by calling open() with the door s pathname as the argument. The return value of the open() call is a descriptor that the client uses locally as the door s descriptor. Finally, the client invokes the server function by using the door_call() function. Door calls are synchronous. Therefore, when the client calls door_ call(), this function doesn t return until the server procedure returns. Whenever a client calls a server function, a new thread in the server process handles that request. A door-based server can handle multiple requests simultaneously. Such a server is known as a concurrent server. The thread allocation and deallocation are transparent to the client because the Door library manages its thread allocation automatically.
Doors Summary
In summary, Doors provides an efficient way for applications to share functionality if the applications are running on the same host machine. In the process of discussing Doors, we introduced the concepts of service provider and service consumer, as well as the concept of encapsulating all system-level calls in a library. However, Doors has two major disadvantages: First, Doors is specific to Solaris and is not platform independent. Second, applications running on separate hosts cannot share functionality. In the next section we discuss the full-blown remote procedure call, which allows applications to share functionality even when they are running on different hosts. RPC is also platform independent. Restricted RPC, or Doors
Restricted RPC (of which Doors is an example) is the most intuitive and ef cient way for two applications to share functionality. The communication between the two applications is through systems calls to the kernel, and these calls are encapsulated in a library. There are two important restrictions on the use of Doors: First, applications sharing functionality must be running on the same host. Second, Doors is not platform independent and can only be used on Solaris systems.
Remote Procedure Call (RPC) We ll now discuss the third type of function call most commonly known as remote procedure call (RPC) or client/server architecture. RPC further developed the concepts introduced in the last section to enable calls to be
Remote Procedure Call (RPC)
made to applications running on separate hosts and connected by a network. RPC introduced for the first time, although in a rudimentary way, the declaration of the service interface. RPC also introduced the concept of marshalling and unmarshalling of parameters, which is required for communication over the network. In addition, RPC further developed the idea of a runtime library so as to include calls to the kernel that involve network routines. We describe how RPC works with a view toward these new concepts. Therefore, we will consider an example similar to the one discussed in the last section on Doors. The server will expose a function for the client applications to call, which will take as an input a long integer and return the cube of the input to the caller.
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