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their own ESB, which connects different modules (such as CRM and ERP). For example, the SAP modules are connected by their own ESB called NetWeaver. NetWeaver can be connected to, for example, IBM s WESB to provide connectivity between SAP applications and other applications (Java/J2EE).
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The third pattern is federated ESBs and is similar to the directly connected ESBs pattern in that multiple ESBs are connected, as shown in Figure 8.16. However, one of the participating ESBs has a master/ slave relationship with the other ESBs and exerts control over what is accessible to the participants. This third pattern can be used by moderately autonomous departments in an enterprise that want to share their services with other departments.
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Brokered ESBs
The fourth deployment pattern is brokered ESBs. In this pattern, a broker is employed to mediate between connected ESBs. Each ESB has its own registry and controls what type of interactions are allowed
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outside its domain. This pattern can be used by autonomous departments that develop and deploy their own services but want to expose a select group of services to the rest of the enterprise. This configuration is shown in Figure 8.17. Types of ESBs Fundamentally, three kinds of ESBs are available on the market. Of course, IBM has the most complete and comprehensive product line in the area of connectivity products. We briefly describe each type of ESB and related products as well as the main advantages of each of them.
Application Server Based ESBs
This type of Enterprise Service Bus uses application servers as the backbone. In addition to the typical synchronous function, they also have some support for asynchronous messaging. For the asynchronous message, the systems bus is used as the backbone. The main advantage of these ESBs is that they are comparatively low-cost products. Another important advantage is that they are easy to set up at deployment time.
Enterprise Service Bus
These products strength is in dealing with XML and Java. However, they offer challenges if a more diverse set of applications need to be integrated. In addition, they are typically used to integrate a comparatively small number of applications because this type of ESB is not scalable for a large number of applications. The prime example of this type of ESB product is IBM s WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus (WESB), which is based on IBM s WebSphere Application Server (WAS). WESB offers the following features and advantages:
Provides standards-based integration, which allows you to create and deploy interactions between applications and services quickly and easily, with reduced number and complexity of interfaces. Offers easy-to-use tools that require minimal programming skills and are simple to install, con gure, build, and manage. Recon gures dynamically to meet changing business processing loads. Provides easy interactions with any JMS and HTTP applications. Supported on a large number of operating systems, including AIX, HP UNIX, I Family, Linux, Sun Solaris, Windows, and z/OS. Increases business agility and exibility and extends easily to a federated ESB model. Supports hundreds of independent software vendors (ISVs) through WebSphere adapters. Adapters are discussed in 9.
Messaging System Based ESBs
In this type of ESB, the backbone is a messaging (asynchronous) system such as IBM s WebSphere MQ. These Enterprise Service Buses also support both types of messaging: synchronous and asynchronous. There are three main advantages of this type of ESB over the other two:
They offer the most scalable solution to the problem of application integration as far as support for high transaction volume is considered. They provide for integrating the most diverse set of applications, including Java, C/C++, and COBOL applications. They guarantee delivery of messages exchanged between the service consumer and service provider. Note that the two other types of ESBs cannot provide such a guarantee. However, messaging system based ESBs require substantially more work to set up as compared to the other two types of ESBs. Also, this type of application integration costs substantially more when compared to the two other integration schemes.
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