visual basic barcode generator Nine in Java

Print PDF417 in Java Nine

Nine
PDF-417 2d Barcode Reader In Java
Using Barcode Control SDK for Java Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Java applications.
Printing PDF417 In Java
Using Barcode drawer for Java Control to generate, create PDF-417 2d barcode image in Java applications.
Web Services
Scan PDF 417 In Java
Using Barcode recognizer for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
Barcode Drawer In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create barcode image in Java applications.
C++ Application
Reading Bar Code In Java
Using Barcode scanner for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
Painting PDF417 In C#.NET
Using Barcode creation for VS .NET Control to generate, create PDF417 image in .NET framework applications.
Pearl Application
Painting PDF 417 In VS .NET
Using Barcode creation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create PDF-417 2d barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
PDF 417 Creation In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode generator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create PDF417 image in .NET applications.
SOAP/ HTTP
Painting PDF417 In VB.NET
Using Barcode drawer for VS .NET Control to generate, create PDF-417 2d barcode image in .NET framework applications.
Universal Product Code Version A Generator In Java
Using Barcode generator for Java Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in Java applications.
SOAP/ MQ
Make EAN / UCC - 13 In Java
Using Barcode printer for Java Control to generate, create EAN-13 Supplement 5 image in Java applications.
Create Barcode In Java
Using Barcode drawer for Java Control to generate, create bar code image in Java applications.
EDI/ MSMQ
Planet Generator In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create USPS Confirm Service Barcode image in Java applications.
Creating USS-128 In Objective-C
Using Barcode drawer for iPad Control to generate, create UCC-128 image in iPad applications.
WebSphere Message Broker
Recognizing Barcode In Java
Using Barcode Control SDK for Java Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Java applications.
Read Data Matrix 2d Barcode In Java
Using Barcode reader for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
RMI/ JMS
Generating GS1 128 In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create UCC.EAN - 128 image in Software applications.
Encoding Data Matrix ECC200 In Objective-C
Using Barcode printer for iPhone Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in iPhone applications.
Copybook/ MQ
Print Code 128A In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set B image in Software applications.
Creating GS1-128 In None
Using Barcode generator for Font Control to generate, create USS-128 image in Font applications.
J2EE Application MQ Server
CICS Application (MQ Enabled) CICS TS Mainframe: z/OS
Integrating a CICS application with a variety of applications using WMB
mainframe side but would have retained the scalability of the solution in terms of transaction volume. Figure 9.14 shows another example of mainframe integration with a diverse set of applications. This time the mainframe applications being integrated are IMS applications, and an MQ bridge and an MQ server are employed. In addition, OTMA is also used. The other choice which would have maintained the high transaction volume and guarantee of message delivery capabilities would have been to use only an MQ server. However, this second choice would have required substantial changes on the mainframe side.
Comparison of WMB and WESB
Table 9.4 provides a summary comparison of two ESB-based approaches for integrating mainframe applications. Generally speaking, WMB provides a more powerful approach, but it is more expensive and takes more
Integrating Mainframe Applications
Web Services
C++ Application
Pearl Application
SOAP/ HTTP
SOAP/ MQ
EDI/ MSMQ
WebSphere Message Broker
RMI/ JMS
Copybook/ MQ
J2EE Application MQ Server MQ Bridge OTMA
IMS Application IMS TM Mainframe: z/OS
using WMB
IMS applications being integrated with a variety of other applications
TABLE 9.4 Feature Scalability Reliability
Comparison of WESB-Based Integration and WMB-Based Integration Message Broker ESB High volume Proven, reliable Yes No preferred data type Any protocol can be used None Comparatively expensive More time needed WebSphere ESB Lower volume Newer product No XML centric HTTP is preferred Java/J2EE Much lower cost Fast setup
Guaranteed delivery Data type centricity Protocols Preferred language Cost Time to production
Nine
time to set up. On the other hand, WESB is much cheaper and is easy to set up, but it has limited capabilities compared to WMB ESB. Conclusion In this chapter, we reviewed the various options available for integrating mainframe applications in a Service-Oriented Architecture. This was made possible by first exposing the mainframe applications as services, either as Web Services or MQ-based services. We started the chapter by reviewing basic facts about the two major types of mainframe applications. These two types of applications are IMS applications and CICS applications. You learned that these two types of applications constitute the backbone of the IT structure of almost all major corporations and large organizations (including governments). Therefore, it is imperative that methods be found to integrate these mainframe applications in a Service-Oriented Architecture. We first considered point-to-point integration of the mainframe with other applications in an enterprise. In a point-to-point integration, each distinct pair of applications involves a separate connection and integration scheme. For point-to-point integration of mainframe applications, we focused on exposing the functionalities embedded in IMS applications and CICS applications as services of some kind. Sometimes it is convenient to expose the functionalities embedded in these applications as Web Services, while at other times it is more prudent to expose the functionalities as messaging-based services. For these two types of mainframe applications (IMS applications and CICS application), you learned there are four different methods of integrating in the point-to-point approach. Two of these four methods expose the mainframe applications functionalities as services, which are based on messaging software such as WebSphere MQ, whereas the other two methods expose the mainframe applications functionalities as Web Services. Although the Web Services provide the advantage of being based on open standards, the services based on the messaging system (MQ) generally provide a more scalable solution as well as guarantee delivery of messages between the service provider and service consumer. Of the two MQ-based methods of integrating IMS and CICS applications, one method, called MQ enablement, requires substantial changes on the mainframe side. However, this method provides the most scalable solution in terms of the volume of transactions. The second method, using an MQ server, additionally employs an MQ bridge, which reduces the need to change the mainframe applications substantially. The remaining two methods for integrating IMS applications involve IMS SOAP Gateway and IMS TM Resource Adapter. Both of
Integrating Mainframe Applications
these expose the IMS applications functionalities as Web Services. The Web Services exposed through the IMS SOAP Gateway have tight coupling with the existing functionality in the IMS application, and they require a distributed platform to host SOAP Gateway, which can limit the scalability of the solution in regard to the transaction volume. In case of the IMS TM Resource Adapter, a distributed platform is also required as well as a J2EE container such as WebSphere Application Server. However, this latter approach offers loose coupling between the exposed Web Services and the IMS applications, because the IMS applications are exposed indirectly through the use of J2EE components (also called service components) such as Enterprise Java Beans (EJBs). The scalability is not a serious issue in this latter approach because J2EE components are designed for high transaction volumes. In the case of CICS applications, the remaining approaches are directly exposing CICS applications as Web Services and indirectly exposing them as Web Services using CICS Transaction Gateway and Resource Adapter. The first approach can be applied only if a new version (version 3.1 and higher) of CICS Transaction Server is in use on the mainframe. In this first approach, there is tight coupling between the CICS applications functionalities and the exposed services. If you are using an older version of CICS Transaction Server on the mainframe, the second approach of indirectly exposing the CICS applications as Web Services must be employed. This approach has the advantage that there is loose coupling between the exposed services and the functionalities embedded in the CICS applications. This loose coupling is the result of using J2EE components (such as EJBs) as the front end for exposing the CICS applications as Web Services. These point-to-point approaches for integrating mainframe applications are suitable if the mainframe application is being integrated with one or two other, more modern applications, such as a Java/J2EE application. If the number of applications is larger, an Enterprise Service Bus based integration approach of indirectly connecting the applications to the mainframe application should be employed. The use of an ESB for integration purposes greatly reduces the number of connections required and provides loose coupling between the applications. Individual applications can be added or removed easily from the integrated structure without affecting other applications in the structure. In this chapter, we described various approaches that employ ESB for integrating mainframe applications with other, more modern applications. These approaches are based on two major types of ESBs. The first type is based on the application server. IBM s WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus (ESB), which is based on WebSphere Application Server (WAS), is an example of such an ESB. These ESBs primarily cater to Web Services, XML, and J2EE-centric applications. In order to use
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.