SAP Server Application Server in Java

Making PDF417 in Java SAP Server Application Server

SAP Server Application Server
PDF 417 Recognizer In Java
Using Barcode Control SDK for Java Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Java applications.
Making PDF417 In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create PDF417 image in Java applications.
RFC-Enabled Functions
Scan PDF-417 2d Barcode In Java
Using Barcode decoder for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
Barcode Maker In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create barcode image in Java applications.
Synchronous Callback
Bar Code Scanner In Java
Using Barcode scanner for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
Create PDF 417 In C#
Using Barcode generator for VS .NET Control to generate, create PDF-417 2d barcode image in .NET applications.
End Point
PDF417 Encoder In .NET
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create PDF-417 2d barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
Drawing PDF-417 2d Barcode In .NET Framework
Using Barcode maker for VS .NET Control to generate, create PDF417 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
ALE IDocs
PDF 417 Encoder In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode creator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create PDF 417 image in VS .NET applications.
Bar Code Generator In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create bar code image in Java applications.
ALE Inbound
Encode Data Matrix ECC200 In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in Java applications.
Universal Product Code Version A Creation In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 5 image in Java applications.
End Point
MSI Plessey Printer In Java
Using Barcode encoder for Java Control to generate, create MSI Plessey image in Java applications.
Encoding EAN / UCC - 13 In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode generation for Reporting Service Control to generate, create GS1 - 13 image in Reporting Service applications.
SAP Queues
EAN-13 Maker In None
Using Barcode maker for Font Control to generate, create GS1 - 13 image in Font applications.
Making Barcode In Objective-C
Using Barcode drawer for iPad Control to generate, create bar code image in iPad applications.
qRFC Interface
Encode GS1 - 12 In VS .NET
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create UPC-A image in ASP.NET applications.
Printing GS1 128 In Objective-C
Using Barcode maker for iPad Control to generate, create EAN128 image in iPad applications.
Event Recovery
Draw DataMatrix In Objective-C
Using Barcode printer for iPad Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in iPad applications.
Reading GS1 - 13 In C#
Using Barcode reader for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Event Table
Poll for Event
Advanced Event Processing SAP Adapter
End Point
Inbound processing interfaces
Integrating Package Applications
the event data, and event recovery is provided to track and recover events in case of abrupt termination.
Advanced Event Processing interface In this case, the adapter polls the SAP server for events. When it discovers events to be processed, it sends the events to the end point (application/component).
Exposure as Web Services As mentioned previously, some of the package applications (EISs) directly expose some of their functionality and data as Web Services. For example, SAP directly exposes some of its functionality as Web Services. Any external application that has a network connection can use such functionality, thus providing another integration method for these package applications. However, many times this direct exposure is not enough because the functionality needed by a consumer application may not be wholly contained in a single package application. In addition, because only some of the functionality of a given package application is exposed directly as Web Services, there is sometimes still a need to expose the remaining functionality as Web Services. The method described previously in this chapter that employs adapters to integrate the package application with modern applications (particularly Java/J2EE applications) comes in handy. This is because once the functionality and data contained in the package applications have been integrated with J2EE components, it is easy to expose these components as Web Services. The methods to expose J2EE components as Web Services is discussed in some detail in 15; therefore, refer to 15 for further information on this subject. Exposing a package application as Web Services using this indirect method is shown schematically in Figure 10.11. Conclusion In this chapter, we described the integration of package applications, which are sometimes referred to as Enterprise Information Systems (EISs), with other application types in the enterprise. We focused on the use of adapters, which can be used along with brokers (application servers or ESBs) to integrate these types of applications. We started out with a general description of the adapters and then we described the J2EE Connector Architecture (JCA), which reduces the number of different adapters needed for a given package application. Compliance of both the broker and the adapter with JCA specifications greatly simplifies the integration of package application. Next, we demonstrated the use of adapters for integration by considering a specific package application system, namely SAP. For this we
Ten
Client Application
Application Server/Broker Web Services Java/J2EE Components
Adapter
Package Application
components
Indirectly exposing a package application using an adapter and Java/J2EE
first discussed the SAP application and the various interfaces you can use to connect to such an application. Next, we described the WebSphere Adapter for SAP Software, which provides a compressive way to access the functionality and data embedded in an SAP application. Lastly, we discussed how you can indirectly expose the functionality and data pertaining to a package application as Web Services. This indirect method involves first integrating the package application with J2EE/Java components in an application server via the use of an adapter. Then the Java/J2EE component is exposed as Web Services using the bottom-up method described in 15 of this book. In this bottom-up approach, you first use the Java2WSDL automated tool with a Java class to generate a WSDL document for the service. Then you use the automated tool WSDL2Java to generate the binding and the artifacts needed on the server side and the client side. After the EIS has been exposed as a service, any other application can use the service either by integrating in a point-to-point manner or by connecting the EIS to an ESB through a SOAP/HTTP port.
Understanding and Developing Web Services
Part
This page intentionally left blank
XML is probably the most important pillar of Web Services. XML documents are often used as a means for passing information between the service provider and service consumer. XML also forms the basis for WSDL (Web Services Description Language), which is used to declare the interface that a Web Service exposes to the consumer of the service. Additionally, XML underlies the SOAP protocol for accessing a Web Service. Lastly, UDDI (Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration), which is used to publish and discover a Web Service, is also based on XML. Web Services often pass information using XML documents. Therefore, the applications that implement Web Services or the applications that act as the consumer of Web Services must be able to interpret the information contained in an XML document. In addition, these applications must be able to extract and process the information contained in an XML document. Furthermore, they must be able to assemble XML documents from the results of this business processing. In this chapter, we describe the concepts and techniques for the use of XML that are important in implementing Web Services and their clients. We start with an overview of the XML language. This overview includes the basic concepts as well as a description of the basic structure of an XML document. Next, we discuss the concept of namespaces, which is used to avoid the collision of names in different spaces and to extend the use of the vocabulary defined in one specific domain to other domains. Schemas, which define the structure and grammar for a particular type of XML document, are discussed following namespaces. Finally, we discuss the various models you can use for parsing, processing, creating, and editing an XML document.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.