visual basic barcode printing The binding input, output, and fault Elements in Java

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The binding input, output, and fault Elements
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The binding operation element has three child elements. It may have an input element, an output element, and optionally one or more fault elements. This structure is identical to the structure of the operation element belonging to the element portType. All three of these elements
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have one attribute each, each called name. For the input and output elements, the name attribute is optional. However, this attribute is mandatory for a fault element.
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The service and port Elements
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A service element is a container of port elements; therefore, we discuss the port element first. A port element contains an extensibility element that specifies the network address of a given service implementation. This element has two attributes. The first attribute, name, is required and specifies the name of the port (that is, the name of a specific service implementation). The second attribute, binding, is also required and refers to the binding for which port provides a specific network address. As indicated previously, the service element groups all related port elements. Each port is linked to the same port type and therefore provides semantically equivalent functionality at different network addresses. The service element has one required attribute: name. The name attribute specifies the name of the service and must be unique within the scope of the WSDL document. Listing 13-9 provides an example of a service element definition.
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Listing 13-9
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Listing 13.9: Example of a WSDL service element 1 <service name="weatherForeCastService"> 2 <port name="premierForecast" binding="tns:weatherServiceSoapBinding"> 3 <SOAP-EXT:address 4 location=http://myCompany.com/servlet/forecaster/> 5 </port> 6 </service>
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Logical Relationships Now that we have gone over all the important elements and attributes of a WSDL document, we are in a position to summarize the logical relationships among these different elements. These relationships are shown schematically in Figure 13.4. Some of these relationships are established through the use of attributes and child elements. SOAP Binding WSDL specifications contain three bindings: SOAP, HTTP, and MIME. You have previously seen some examples of SOAP binding. The extensibility elements of each of these bindings are defined in separate namespaces. We will only cover the SOAP binding here. In general, the
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WSDL
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service n definitions port binding binding n operation 1 input 1 output n definitions fault
type
portType n identical names operation 1 input 1 output n definitions fault
Implementation element Interface definition element Containment relationship Association relationship
types n type Element/ type
message n part
Logical relationships among elements of a WSDL document
concept of extensibility elements allows for the definition of arbitrary protocol bindings, although WSDL specifications only contain the aforementioned three bindings. In discussing the implementation part of the WSDL Web Services description, we have already covered some example of SOAP extensibility elements. In this section, we will take a more detailed look at these types of elements, which are always contained in WSDL elements corresponding to the implementation part. As previously mentioned, these SOAP extensibility elements carry the prefix SOAP-EXT and their namespace corresponds to the URI http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ wsdl/soap/. The SOAP extensibility elements we discuss here are shown in Table 13.7, along with the corresponding WSDL elements that contain them. These extensibility elements are described in the following subsections.
SOAP binding Extensibility Element
This SOAP extensibility element is the direct child of the WSDL binding element. It is mandatory for SOAP binding and has two attributes. The first attribute is transport, which is used to specify the communication protocol used for the SOAP message. The WS-I Basic Profile limits the
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SOAP Extensibility Elements and the Corresponding WSDL Container Elements
TABLE 13.7
SOAP Extensibility Elements binding operation body, header, headerFault body, header, headerFault fault address
WSDL Container Elements binding operation input output fault port
communication protocols to HTTP and HTTPS. The HTTP protocol is specified as the URI http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/http/. The second attribute for this extensibility element is called style, and it can have one of two values: rpc or document. This attribute provides a default value for each operation at this higher level. An operation can override this selection. If the attribute is omitted, the default value is document. If the value of the style attribute is document, the content of the body element of the SOAP message can be an arbitrary XML instance document. SOAP does not place any restrictions on the structure of the XML instance carried in the body element of the SOAP message. Listing 13-10 shows a sample XML instance contained in the body element of a SOAP message. This message can be used by the service provider to update a customer s address.
Listing 13-10
Listing 13.10: Example of a SOAP document style message 1 <SOAP-ENV:Envelope 2 xmlns:SOAP-ENV=http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/> 3 <SOAP-ENV:Body> 4 <add:address xmlns:add=http://myCompany.com/ns/employees> 5 <add:name> 6 <add:firstName>John</add:firstName> 7 <add:lastName>Smith</add:lastName> 8 </add:name> 9 <add:streetAddress>45 Alpine Street</add:streetAddress> 10 <add:city>New York</add:city> 11 <add:state>New York</add:state> 12 <add:postalCode>43321</add:postalCode> 13 </add:address> 14 </SOAP-ENV:Body> 15 </SOAP-ENV:Envelope>
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