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Disruptive or Deconstructive Technology
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In his 2000 business book, The Innovator s Dilemma, author Clayton Christensen describes how disruptive technologies have precipitated the failure
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Introduction
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of leading products, and their associated and well-managed firms. Christensen defines criteria to identify disruptive technologies regardless of their market. These technologies have the potential to replace mainstream technologies as well as their associated products and principal vendors. Disruptive technologies, abstractly defined by Christensen, are typically cheaper, simpler, smaller, and, frequently, more convenient than their mainstream counterparts. Softswitch, relative to Class 4 and 5 switches, is a disruptive technology. For the competitive service provider, softswitch is cheaper, simpler, smaller, and frequently more convenient than Class 4 or 5. In order for a technology to be truly disruptive, it must disrupt an incumbent vendor or service provider. Some entity must go out of business before a technology can be considered disruptive. Although it is too early to point out a switch vendor or incumbent service provider that has been driven out of business by softswitch, softswitch technologies are potentially disruptive to both incumbent telephone companies and Class 4 and 5 switch vendors. It can also be argued that the telephone industry has been deconstructed by the Internet or Internet-related technologies. Instead of making long-distance calls or sending faxes over the PSTN, business people now send emails or use web sites. Long-distance calls may be placed over VoIP networks. This decreases demand on the legacy telephone network and also decreases demand for telephone switching equipment. This book describes how softswitch meets or exceeds Class 4 and 5 switch technologies and poses a potentially disruptive scenario for Class 4 and 5 vendors and telephone service providers. In a market economy, it is inevitable that if competition cannot come in the local loop it will surely come to the local loop. Given that softswitch solutions match Class 4 and 5 switches in terms of reliability, scalability, QoS, signaling, and features while having well-defined advantages over Class 4 and 5, softswitch provides the crucial avenue for competitive service providers to enter telecommunications markets worldwide.
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Source: Softswitch Architecture for VoIP
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The Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN)
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The Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN)
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An understanding of the workings of the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) is best grasped by understanding its three major components: access, switching, and transport (see Figure 2-1). Each element has evolved over the 100-plus year history of the PSTN. Access pertains to how a user accesses the network. Switching refers to how a call is switched or routed through the network, and transport describes how a call travels or is transported over the network.
Access
Access refers to how the user accesses the telephone network. For most users, access is gained to the network via a telephone handset. Transmission and reception is via diaphragms where the mouthpiece converts the air pressure of voice into an analog electromagnetic wave for transmission to the switch. The earpiece performs this process in reverse. The most sophisticated aspect of the handset is its Dual-Tone Multifrequency (DTMF) function, which signals the switch by tones. The handset is usually connected to the central office (where the switch is located) via copper wire known as twisted pair because, in most cases, it consists of a twisted pair of copper wire. The stretch of copper wire connects the telephone handset to the central office. Everything that runs between the subscriber and the central office is known as outside plant. Telephone equipment at the subscriber end is called customer premise equipment (CPE).
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