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SIP: Alternative Softswitch Architecture
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Figure 5-4 SIP gateways in longdistance bypass and enterprise telephony
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Comparison of SIP to H.323
H.323 is a blanket specification, meaning that it is not a protocol by itself, but rather defines how to use other protocols in a specific manner to create a service. H.323 was developed by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) in the mid-1990s and consists of several protocols, including H.225 registration, admission, and status (RAS) signaling, H.225.0 call signaling, H.245 control signaling, and RTP. It also includes several standards for voice and video digitization and compression. H.323 was originally designed to implement multimedia conferences on a LAN. In its original form, it was intended that certain conferences would be announced, or advertised in advance, and interested parties would subscribe or register to participate in the conference. These conferences may be interactive or may be broadcast events with participants viewing or listening only. The applications were expanded to include participants who were not located on the same LAN as well as more general calling capabilities. This resulted in more complexity to the protocol and underlying applications. H.323 is a very large protocol suite, requiring a large amount of memory for
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SIP: Alternative Softswitch Architecture
SIP: Alternative Softswitch Architecture
code and data space. H.323 used a messaging scheme called Abstract Syntax Notation (ASN.1). ASN.1 is widely used by the ITU, but it is difficult for users to read and understand directly. The use of ASN.1 requires special test equipment to be built that can decode the ASN.1 messages and translate them into human-readable format for easier network testing and debugging. The IETF sought to create a much simpler, yet powerful protocol that could be used for call setup and management in support of VoIP applications. A working group was formed, and the result of that effort was the development of the SIP, which was ratified by the IETF as RFC 2543 in 1999. H.323 and SIP have four fields of comparison: complexity, extensibility, scalability, and services.
Complexity of H.323 Versus SIP
As VoIP protocols evolve, they become more efficient. Simplicity fosters acceptance. In this case, SIP is a marked improvement over H.323 primarily due to its greater simplicity, which translates to greater reliability. Given its simplicity relative to H.323, SIP enjoys a faster call setup, a prerequisite for carrier-grade voice applications. H.323 is a rather complex protocol. The sum total of the base specifications alone is 736 pages. SIP, on the other hand, along with its call control extensions and SDPs totals 276 pages in RFC 3261. H.323 defines hundreds of elements, while SIP has only 37 headers (32 in the base specification, 5 in the call control extensions), each with a small number of values and parameters, but that contain more information. A basic but interoperable SIP Internet telephony implementation can get by with four headers (To, From, Call-ID, and CSeq) and three request types (IN-VITE, ACK, and BYE) and is small enough to be assigned as a homework programming problem. A fully functional SIP client agent with a graphical user interface (GUI) has been implemented in just two man-months. H.323 uses a binary representation for its messages, based on ASN.1 and the packed encoding rules (PER). SIP, on the other hand, encodes its messages as text, similar to HTTP7 and the Real-Time Streaming Protocol
Fielding, R., J. Gettys, J. Mogul, H. Nielsen, and T. Berners-Lee. Request for Comments (Proposed Standard) 2068: Hypertext transfer protocol HTTP/1.1. Internet Engineering Task Force, January 1997.
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