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Figure 8-1 Students, chairs and mirrors! Image courtesy Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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Figure 8-2 The boat catches fire Archimedes was right. Image courtesy Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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Figure 8-3 The burnt hull. Image courtesy Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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Figure 8-4 Lining up the mirrors. Image courtesy Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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Project 16: Build Your Own Solar Death Ray
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Figure 8-5 Working it all out! Image courtesy Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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Project 16: Build Your Own Solar Death Ray
You will need: Warning
Sheet of MDF Sheet of flexible mirror acrylic 72 long self-tapping screws I have used acrylic mirror in this project because it is very easy to work with, and can be cut easily using a band saw; however, there is nothing to stop you using a glass mirror if it is available and you have the correct tools to cut it and work with it my only advice is it will be harder to work with and much more fragile.
Optional
Silicone sealant
Tools
Drill bit Hand/cordless drill Glue gun and sticks Ruler Set square Bandsaw
OK, so you have finally decided the time is nigh to melt your little brother. While he might be hard to melt, you can certainly singe him with this modular solar death ray! Don t worry you won t need lots of chairs and big A4 mirrors like the guys at MIT! Instead, this modular death ray relies on little tiles which are cut from plastic mirror. The plan is really simple you build the death ray a tile at a time. One tile is good to experiment
Optional
Mastic gun
with, but once you become more confident and want to expand, you can simply add more tiles! To begin with, I recommend that you cut yourself a piece of MDF that is 36 cm square, although please bear in mind that this measurement is wholly arbitrary. Now using a ruler and set square, divide the sheet into a matrix of six squares by six squares. This will give you thirty-six equal squares 6 cm square. Now, using the ruler and set square, draw a line 1 cm either side of each line making up the squares. This will leave you with a sheet that does not look dissimilar to Figure 8-6. You are now going to drill holes for the screws that will support the mirrors. You will need to select a drill that is slightly smaller than the screw that you are going to drill the hole for. However, please note that the screw does not need to be a tight fit in the hole, as it would be if you were joining two pieces of wood. Instead, the screw is only going to be used for light adjustment, so the screw can be a relatively slack fit in the hole. Looking at your board of squares, you are going to be drilling two holes in each 6 cm square. The holes will be at the top left and bottom right, where the lines cross to form the smaller square inside each square. Sounds confusing, well, take a look at the furnace drilling diagram (Figure 8-7), which shows where to drill in each square.
Project 16: Build Your Own Solar Death Ray
Figure 8-7 Furnace drilling diagram.
Once you have drilled all 72 holes, you are going to need to think about getting those screws in place. This is a really tedious job, so either ask a younger sibling, or failing that, if you are an only child you might like to consider investing in an electric screwdriver the lazy man s way out. You want to put the screws in so that they just protrude from the other side a little way (Figure 8-8). Now is a good time to take your acrylic sheet of mirror, and, on a bandsaw, cut 36 identical
Figure 8-6 Sheet of MDF marked out.
Figure 8-8 Solar furnace with the screws in place.
Project 16: Build Your Own Solar Death Ray
6 6 cm squares. An easy way to do this is to set the gate on your band saw to 6 cm from the blade. Take a couple of cuts from your mirror, to give you 6 cm strips, and then cut these strips into squares using the gate at the same measurement. Once you have done this, you need to fix the mirrors to the base plate of the solar furnace. You need to pick a corner, which is different to the ones that the screws are positioned in, and stick to this corner. What you will be doing is applying a large glob of either glue or silicone sealant, into which the corner of the mirror tile is immersed. The other two corners are supported on screws, which permit adjustment of the tile s angle relative to the base board (Figure 8-9). When all the mirrors are in place, stick a small removable piece of paper, for example a Post-It note to each of the mirrors. Set your collector up so that it faces the sun. Remove one of the pieces of paper in one of the corner mirrors notice where the light forms a bright patch and set up an object to be heated or piece of wood there. Draw an X where there is a bright patch. Now, one by one, using the screws for adjustment, you can change the angle of each individual mirror. Cover and uncover mirrors one by one using the Post-It notes you will need to work quickly as you will find that the sun is constantly changing position.
Eventually you will find that you can focus all of the mirrors onto a single point this concentrated energy can be used for cooking, heating, or experiments (burning things!).
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