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for user and daemon files. Each file system has a mount point that is usually created in the top level of the root file system. For example, the /export file system is obviously mounted in the top level of /. The mount point is created by using the mkdir command:
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# mkdir /export
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In contrast, the /export/home file system, which usually holds the home directories of users and user files, is mounted in the top level of the /export file system. Thus, the mount point is created by using the following command:
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# mkdir /export/home
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A single logical file system can be created on a single slice, but cannot exist on more than one slice, unless there is an extra level of abstraction between the logical and physical file systems (for example, a virtual disk is created using DiskSuite, which spans many physical disks). A physical disk can also contain more than one slice. On SPARC architecture systems, eight slices can be used, numbered zero through seven. On Intel architecture systems, however, ten slices are available, numbered zero through nine. The actual assignment of logical file systems to physical slices is a matter of discretion for the individual administrator, and although there are customary assignments recommended by Sun and other hardware vendors, a specific site policy, or an application s requirements, might necessitate the development of a local policy. For example, database servers often make quite specific requirements about the allocation of disk slices to improve performance. However, with modern, highperformance RAID systems, these recommendations are often redundant. Because many organization have many different kinds of systems deployed, it is useful to maintain compatibility between systems as much as possible. For more details, see the Disk Space Planning section of 3.
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A popular format of read-only mass storage on many servers is the compact disc read-only memory (CD-ROM). Although earlier releases of Solaris worked best with Sun-branded CD-ROM drives, as of Solaris 2.6, Solaris 10 fully supports all SCSI-2 CD-ROM drives. For systems running older versions of Solaris, it may still be possible to use a third-party drive, but the drive must support 512-byte sectors (the Sun standard). A second Sun default to be aware of is that CD-ROM drives must usually have the SCSI target ID of 6, although this limitation has again been overcome in later releases of the kernel. However, a number of third-party applications with auto detect functions may still expect to see the CD-ROM drive at SCSI ID 6. A number of different CD-ROM drive formats are also supported with the mount command, which is used to attach CD-ROM drives to the file system. It is common to use the mount point /cdrom for the primary CD-ROM device in Solaris 10 systems, although it is possible to use a different mount point for mounting the device by using a command-line argument to mount.
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Zip and Jaz Drives
There are two ways to install Zip and Jaz drives: by treating the drive as a SCSI disk, in which case format data needs to be added to the system to recognize it, or by using Andy Polyakov s ziptool, which formats and manages protection modes supported by Zip 100 and Jaz 1GB/2GB drives. Both of these techniques support only SCSI and not parallel port drives. Treating the Zip 100 SCSI drive or the Jaz 1GB drive as a normal SCSI device is the easiest approach, because there is built-in Solaris 10 support for these SCSI devices. However, only standard, non-write-protected disks can be used.
Tape Drives
Solaris 10 supports a wide variety of magnetic tapes using the remote magtape (rmt) protocol. Tapes are generally used as backup devices rather than as interactive storage devices. What they lack in availability they definitely make up for in storage capacity: many DAT drives have capacities of 24GB, making it easy to perform a complete backup of many server systems on a single tape. This removes the need for late-night monitoring by operations staff to insert new tapes when full, as many administrators will have experienced in the past. Device files for tape drives are found in the /dev/rmt directory. They are numbered sequentially from 0, so default drives generally are available as /dev/rmt/0. Low-density drives can be specified by adding l to the device filename, with medium-density drives having m added. For example, a medium-density drive at location 0 would be written as /dev/rmt/0m, and a low-density drive at location 1 would be written as /dev/rmt/1l. By default, the tape will be rewound when being written to to specify that a tape should not be rewound, simply add n to the device name. Thus, a medium-density drive at location 0 with no rewind would be written as /dev/rmt/0mn. To back up to a remote drive, use the command ufsdump, which is an incremental file system dumping program. For example, to create a full backup of the /dev/rdsk/ c0t1d0s1 file system to the tape system /dev/rmt/0, simply use the following command:
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