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The following command can be used to manage system devices.
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The format command displays the following options:
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Nominates a disk to format Specifies a disk type Specifies a partition table Specifies the current disk Formats the current disk Executes the fdisk program against the current disk Repairs a faulty sector on the current disk Translates a disk address Writes a disk label Analyzes errors Lists problems
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Examines backup labels Verifies labels Saves new partition data Sets a volume name Runs command in a shell Exits application
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Summary
In this chapter, you have learned how to configure devices and manage system resources for the Intel and SPARC platforms. You have seen how mass storage devices such as hard drives can be easily configured and how you can review that configuration.
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Installing Disks and File Systems
isks are the most commonly used persistent storage devices attached to Solaris 10 systems. A wide variety of disks and disk types are available, including those using the Small Computer System Interface (SCSI, pronounced scuzzy ) and Integrated Device Electronics (IDE) interfaces, with a variety of sustained data transfer rates (exceeding 10,000 RPM in some cases). This chapter examines how to install disks and create file systems using standard Solaris 10 commands.
Key Concepts
Solaris file systems are generally of the type UFS (for UNIX File System), although other file system types can be defined in /etc/default/fs. UFS file systems are found on hard disks that have both a raw and block device interface on Solaris, as found in the /dev/rdsk and /dev/dsk directories, respectively. Every partition created on a Solaris file system has its own entry in /dev/dsk and /dev/rdsk. A UFS file system contains the following elements: A boot block, which contains booting data if the file system is bootable A super block, which contains the location of inodes, the size of the file system, the number of blocks, and the status Inodes, which store the details of files on the file system Data blocks, which store the files
Physical and Logical Device Names
One of the most challenging aspects of Solaris hardware to understand is the set of naming convention used by Solaris to refer to devices. Solaris uses a specific set of naming conventions to associate physical devices with instance names on the operating system. For administrators who are new to Solaris, these conventions can be incredibly confusing.
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Part IV:
Managing Devices
In addition, devices can also be referred to by their device name, which is associated with a device file created in the /dev directory after configuration. For example, a hard disk may have the physical device name /pci@1f,0/pci@1,1/ide@3/dad@0,0, which is associated with the device file /dev/dsk/c0t0d0. In some versions of Microsoft Windows, disks are simply labeled by their drive letter (C:, D:, E:, and so on), while in Linux, device files are much simplified (for example, /dev/hda for an IDE hard disk or /dev/sda for a SCSI hard disk). The benefit of the more complex Solaris logical device names and physical device references is that they make it easy to interpret the characteristics of each device by looking at its name. For the preceding disk name example (/pci@1f,0/pci@1,1/ide@3/ dad@0,0), you can see that the IDE hard drive is located on a Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) bus at target 0. When you view the amount of free disk space on the system, for example, it is easy to identify slices on the same disk by looking at the device name:
# df -k Filesystem /proc /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s0 fd /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s3 swap
kbytes 0 1982988 0 1487119 182040
used avail capacity 0 0 0% 615991 1307508 33% 0 0 0% 357511 1070124 26% 416 181624 1%
Mounted on /proc / /dev/fd /usr /tmp
Here, you can see that /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s0 and /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s3 are slice 0 and slice 3 of the disk /dev/dsk/c0t0d0.
Creating a File System
To create a new UFS file system, you first must partition a disk into different slices. You can then use these slices to create new file systems by using the mkfs or newfs command. For example, the following two commands are equivalent for the purposes of creating a new file system on the partition c0t0d0s1:
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