Ethernet in Software

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Robert Metcalfe at Xerox PARC developed Ethernet during the 1970s, although the major standards for Ethernet were not published until the 1980s. Ethernet is a type of physical network that supports virtually any type of computer system, unlike previous networks that supported only certain types of computers. The ether part of the name comes from the material that was thought, in the 19th century, to surround the earth and provide a medium for the transmission of radio waves. In the same way that radio became a ubiquitous mode for transmitting data, Ethernet has become the most commonly used medium for network transmission. Ethernet is the most commonly used link technology supported by Solaris, and comes in five different speeds: 10Base2 2 Mbps 10Base5 5 Mbps 10Base-T 10 Mbps 100Base-T 100 Mbps 1000Base-T/FX 1 Gbps
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The 10, 100, and 1000 indicate the signaling frequency in MHz. There are different types of media that are supported for each baseband, such as 10Base. For example, the 10Base family supports the following media types: Thick coaxial cable Thin coaxial cable Twisted-pair cable Fiber-optic cable Coaxial cable is a shielded, single-strand copper cable that is generally surrounded by an aluminum insulator. It is a highly insulated, reliable transmission medium. In contrast, twisted-pair cable can either be shielded or unshielded. Fiber-optic cable uses light as the transmission medium, and typically achieves the highest bandwidth. However, your choice of transmission media may depend on the distances that need to be covered for interconnection. The following restrictions are imposed on the most commonly used transmission media: 10Base2 185 meters 10Base5 500 meters 10Base-T 150 meters So, in a building where 500-meter cabling is required, only 10Base5 will be suitable, unless a repeater is used, which is a device like a hub that can be used to link different network branches together. Single-mode fiber may be used where long distances of 10 to 15 km are involved. Also, there are limitations on the number of hubs that can be used to extend the logical length of a segment a packet cannot be transmitted through more than four hubs or three cable segments in total, to ensure successful transmission. There are some other restrictions that you should keep in mind when using specific media for example, some types of cabling are more sensitive to electrical interference than others. Solaris systems are typically supplied with a single Ethernet card, supporting 10/ 100 Mbps; however, server systems (such as the 420R) are supplied with quad Ethernet cards, supporting four interfaces operating at 10/100 Mbps. Although Ethernet (specified by the IEEE 802.3 standard)is the most common link type, other supported link types on Solaris include Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) and Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM). FDDI networks use a ring topology based on a transmitting and receiving ring, using high-quality fiber-optic cable, to support high-speed, redundant connections. However, FDDI is expensive compared to Ethernet, and gigabit FDDI is not available. ATM is designed for high quality of service applications, like video and audio streaming, that require a constant amount of bandwidth to operate. Data is transmitted in fixed-size cells of 53 bytes, and a connection is maintained between client and server only as required. Although ATM does not approach the speeds of Gigabit Ethernet, its quality of service provisions benefit certain types of data transmission.
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In terms of the OSI networking model, Ethernet comprises both the Physical layer (Layer 1) and the Data Link layer (Layer 2), although a logical link control protocol is not logically defined. Ethernet has become the technology of choice for LANs. Originally designed to transmit 3 Mbps, a base network interface using Ethernet can now transmit data at 10 Mbps. The latest Ethernet technology supports data transmission at 10 Gbps! Supported media for Ethernet includes thick and thin coaxial, fiber-optic, and twisted-pair cables. The major reason for the success of Ethernet in industry was the adoption of the Ethernet standard (IEEE 802.3), allowing for interoperability between different vendors products. Ethernet specifies the Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD) access method, as well as physical layer specifications. The Ethernet specification allowed many different vendors to produce network interfaces and media that supported Ethernet. Ethernet is a very flexible system, since interfaces operating at different transmission rates can be connected to the same LAN. There are three elements that comprise Ethernet: Physical media segments, which are used to interconnect systems The media access control (MAC) rules that implement access to Ethernet channels A frame that organizes data to be transmitted in a standard way Systems connected to the Ethernet are technically known as stations. Every station on the network is independent access is not centrally controlled, since the medium allows signaling to be received and interpreted by all stations. Transmission across Ethernet occurs in bitwise form. When transmitting data, a station must wait for the channel to be free of data before sending a packet formatted as a frame. If a station has to wait for the channel to be free before sending its own packets, you can appreciate the potential for traffic congestion and a broadcast storm if one station has a lot of data to send. However, after transmitting one packet, each station then competes for the right to transmit each subsequent frame. The MAC access control system prevents traffic congestion from occurring. It is quite normal, for example, for collision rates of 50 percent to exist without any noticeable impact on performance. A more insidious problem occurs with so-called late collisions. These are collisions that occur between two hosts that are not detected because the latency for transmission between the two hosts exceeds the maximum time allowed to detect a collision. If this occurs at greater than 1 percent of the time, serious problems may emerge in terms of data throughput and potential corruption.
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