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If the server is to be multihomed instead of being a router, ensure that /etc/defaultrouter does not exist, and create an /etc/notrouter file:
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server# rm /etc/defaultrouter server# touch /etc/notrouter
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Note that the /etc/defaultrouter file lists a default route and does not make the system a router, even if it is multihomed. To force a system to be a router, you must ensure that the /etc/gateways file has been created empty:
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server# touch /etc/gateways
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Normally, only static routes for single-homed hosts are defined in the /etc/gateways file.
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Viewing Router Configuration
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The ifconfig command is responsible for configuring each network interface at boot time. ifconfig can also be used to check the status of active network interfaces by passing the a parameter:
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Routing and Firewalls
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router# ifconfig -a lo0: flags=849<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST> mtu 8232 inet 127.0.0.1 netmask ff000000 hme0: flags=863<UP,BROADCAST,NOTRAILERS,RUNNING,MULTICAST> mtu 1500 inet 10.17.65.16 netmask ffffff00 broadcast 10.17.65.255 hme1: flags=863<UP,BROADCAST,NOTRAILERS,RUNNING,MULTICAST> mtu 1500 inet 204.17.65.16 netmask ffffff00 broadcast 204.17.65.255
In this case, the primary interface hme0 is running on the internal network, while the secondary interface hme1 is visible to the external network. The netmask for a class C network is used on both interfaces, while both have a distinct broadcast address. This ensures that information broadcast on the internal network is not visible to the external network. There are several parameters shown with ifconfig a, including whether or not the interface is UP or DOWN (i.e., active or inactive). In the following example, the interface has not been enabled at boot time:
server# ifconfig hme1 hme1: flags=863<DOWN,BROADCAST,NOTRAILERS,RUNNING,MULTICAST> mtu 1500 inet 204.17.64.16 netmask ffffff00 broadcast 204.17.64.255
Static Routes
On hosts, routing information can be extracted in two ways: by building a full routing table, exactly as occurs on a router, or by creating a minimal kernel table, containing a single default route for each available router (i.e., static routing). The most common static route is from a host to a local router, as specified in the /etc/defaultrouter file. For example, for the host 204.12.60.24, the entry in /etc/defaultrouter might be
This places a single route in the local routing table. Responsibility for determining the next hop for the message is then passed to the router. Static routes can also be added for servers using in.routed, by defining them in the /etc/gateways file. When using static routing, routing tables in the kernel are defined when the system boots, and do not normally change, unless modified by using the route or ifconfig command. When a local network has a single gateway to the rest of the Internet, static routing is the most appropriate choice.
Routing Protocols
The Routing Information Protocol (RIP) and the Router Discovery Protocol (RDISC) are two of the standard routing protocols for TCP/IP networks, and Solaris supports both. RIP is implemented by in.routed, the routing daemon, and is usually configured to start during multiuser mode startup. The routing daemon always populates the routing
Part V:
Networking
table with a route to every reachable network, but whether or not it advertises its routing availability to other systems is optional. Hosts use the RDISC daemon (in.rdisc) to collect information about routing availability from routers and should run on both routers and hosts. in.rdisc typically creates a default route for each router that responds to requests: this discovery is central to the ability of RDISC-enabled hosts to dynamically adjust to network changes. Routers that only run in.routed cannot be discovered by RDISC-enabled hosts. For hosts running both in.rdisc and in.routed, the latter will operate until an RDISCenabled router is discovered on the network, in which case RDISC will take over routing.
Viewing the Routing Table (netstat r)
The command netstat r shows the current routing table. Routes are always specified as a connection between the local server and a remote machine, via some kind of gateway. The output from the netstat -r command contains several different flags: flag U indicates that the route between the destination and gateway is up; flag G shows that the route passes through a gateway; flag H indicates that the route connects to a host; and flag D signifies that the route was dynamically created using a redirect. There are two other columns shown in the routing table: Ref indicates the number of concurrent routes occupying the same link layer, while Use indicates the number of packets transmitted along the route (on a specific Interface). The following example shows an example server (server.company.com) that has four routes: the first is for the loopback address (lo0), which is Up and is connected through a host. The second route is for the local class C network (204.16.64.0), through the gateway gateway.company.com, which is also Up. The third route is the special multicast route, which is also Up. The fourth route is the default route, pointing to the local network router, which is also Up.
$ netstat -r Routing Table: Destination Gateway Flags Ref Use Interface -------------------- -------------------- ----- ----- ------ --------127.0.0.1 localhost UH 0 877 lo0 204.17.64.0 gateway.company.com U 3 85 hme0 BASE-ADDRESS.MCAST.NET host.company.com U 3 0 hme0 default router.company.com UG 0 303
Manipulating the Routing Table (route)
The route command is used to manually manipulate the routing tables. If dynamic routing is working correctly, manual manipulation should not normally be necessary. However, if static routing is being used, or the RDISC daemon does not discover any routes, it may be necessary to add routes manually. In addition, it may also be necessary
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