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Command Reference
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The following commands can be used to support modem services and Internet access.
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pmadm
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The port monitors are managed by the pmadm command. Port services can be managed by using the following commands:
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pmadm -a pmadm -d pmadm -e pmadm -r Adds a port monitor service Disarms a port monitor service Enables a port monitor service Removes a port monitor service
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sacadm
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The sacadm command is used to manage port monitors. The following functions are available:
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sacadm -a sacadm -e sacadm -d sacadm -s sacadm -k sacadm -l sacadm -r Attaches a new port monitor Arms a port monitor Disarms a port monitor Initializes a port monitor Kills a port monitor Lists port monitor details Deletes a port monitor
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tip is a command that acts like a terminal. It can be used, for example, to access remote systems directly through a serial port, where one system acts as the console for the other.
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Part V:
Networking
tip uses the /etc/remote file to enable it to make connections through the serial port. For example, if you have a profile set up in /etc/remote, it s possible to fire up a terminal session immediately by using the command
# tip profile
where profile is the name of the profile that you ve set up with all the settings that the port requires to operate. tip also uses initialization settings in the .tiprc file to specify its operational parameters. The following table shows the most commonly used tip commands:
Command ~. ~c ~! ~> ~< ~p ~t ~C ~# ~s ~^z Description Exits the session Changes directory Spawns a shell Sends a local file Receives a remote file Sends a local file Receives a remote file Allows a local application to connect to a remote system Issues a break command Defines a variable Suspends tip
Summary
In this chapter, you have learned how to configure and perform remote logins to other networked systems, using both secure and nonsecure (traditional) methods. Although you will almost certainly use an Ethernet card to connect your systems to the Internet, a modem may well be required for backup purposes, so it s useful to understand how these can be configured.
Internet Layer (IPv6)
he TCP/IP protocol suite relies on the Internet Protocol to provide the lowerlevel services required to support the Transport and Application layers in the stack. However, the current version of IP (IPv4) is now approximately 20 years old, and much has changed in the network world since it was introduced the Internet has become globally distributed, commercial transactions are conducted on the Internet, and the sheer number of connected hosts has given rise to routing, configuration, and address allocation problems. If these problems are not fixed, then the Internet in its present form may cease to function at some future time, as it reaches capacity. The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) predicts that this may occur in 2008.
IPv6 Motivation
The maximum number of IP addresses that can be created using IPv4 is 4.3 billion. While this number must have seemed very large when IPv4 was developed, it now represents a fraction of the potential human users of the Internet. While the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) has alleviated the address availability problem, by leasing out addresses dynamically instead of assigning them statically, the always connected, always available broadband world will monopolize these leases. In addition, with the introduction of smart spaces filled with embedded devices with their own IP address, one human may potentially be associated with dozens if not hundreds of different devices. So, one key requirement for an improved IP is the ability to massively increase the pool of available IP addresses. A related requirement has arisen by the effective breaking of end-to-end communication by the introduction of network address translation (NAT). Like DHCP, NAT was introduced to alleviate the IP address availability problem, by assigning a router a public, routable IP address, while assigning all hosts behind the router a private, nonroutable IP address. This reduced the number of public IP addresses required by organizations to connect their hosts to the Internet. NAT also shielded private computers from attacks originating from the Internet, because their IP addresses were nonroutable. However, NAT also made it impossible to perform peer-to-peer authentication, because the router running NAT software essentially
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