barcode dll for vb.net midway# mkdir /cache midway# cfsadmin -c /cache/yorktown in Software

Generation UPC-A Supplement 2 in Software midway# mkdir /cache midway# cfsadmin -c /cache/yorktown

midway# mkdir /cache midway# cfsadmin -c /cache/yorktown
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Here, the cfsadmin command is used to create the cache once the mount point /cache has been created. Now, take a look at how you would force the cache to be used for all accesses from midway to yorktown for the remote file system /staff, which is also mounted locally on /staff:
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# mount -F cachefs -o backfstype=nfs,cachedir=/cache/yorktown yorktown:/ staff /staff
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Once the yorktown:/staff file system has been mounted in this way, users on midway will not notice any difference in operation, except that file access to /staff will be much quicker. It is possible to check the status of the cache by using the cachefsstat command. To verify that /cache/yorktown is operating correctly, you would use the following command:
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# cachefsstat /cache/yorktown
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Alternatively, you can use the cfsadmin command:
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# cfsadmin -l /cache/yorktown cfsadmin: list cache FS information maxblocks 80% minblocks 0% threshblocks 75% maxfiles 80% minfiles 0% threshfiles 75% maxfilesize 12MB yorktown:_staff:_staff
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Note the last line, which is the current cache ID. You need to use the cache ID if you ever need to delete the cache. If you do need to delete a cache, you can use the cfsadmin command with the d option:
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# umount /staff # cfsadmin -d yorktown:_staff:_staff /cache/yorktown
This example unmounts the /staff volume on merlin locally, before attempting to remove the cache by providing its ID along with its mount point.
Enabling the automounter
The automount command installs autofs mount points and associates an automounter map with each mount point. This requires that the automount daemon be running (automountd). When the automount daemon is initialized on the server, no exported directories are mounted by the clients: these are mounted only when a remote user attempts to access a file on the directory from a client. The connection eventually times out, in which case the exported directory is unmounted by the client. The automounter maps usually work with a network information service, like NIS+, to manage shared volumes, meaning that a single home directory for individual users can be provided on request from a single server, no matter which client machine they log into. Connection and reconnection is handled by the automount daemon. If automount starts up and has nothing to mount or unmount, this is reported, and is quite normal:
# automount automount: no mounts automount: no unmounts
Automounter Maps
The behavior of the automounter is determined by a set of files called automounter maps. There are two main types of maps indirect and direct: Indirect map Useful when you are mounting several file systems that will share a common pathname prefix. As you will see shortly, an indirect map can be used to manage the directory tree in /home. Direct map Used to mount file systems where each mount point does not share a common prefix with other mount points in the map. This section looks at examples of each of these types of maps. An additional map, called the master map, is used by the automounter to determine the names of the files corresponding to the direct and indirect maps.
Indirect Maps
The most common type of automounter maps are indirect maps, which correspond to regularly named file systems like /home, or /usr directory trees. Regularly named file systems share the same directory prefix. For example, the directories /home/jdoe and /home/sdoe are regularly named directories in the /home directory tree.
Part VI:
Services, Directories, and Applications
Normally, indirect maps are stored in the /etc directory, and are named with the convention auto_directory, where directory is the name of the directory prefix (without slashes) that the indirect map is responsible for. As an example, the indirect map responsible for the /home directory is usually named auto_home. An indirect map is made up of a series of entries in the following format:
directory options host:filesystem
Here, directory is the relative pathname of a directory that will be appended to the name of the directory that corresponds to this indirect map, as specified in the master map file. (The master map is covered later in this section.) For options, you can use any of the mount options covered earlier in this chapter. To specify options, you need to prefix the first option with a dash ( ). If you do not need any extra options, you can omit the options entirely. The final entry in the map contains the location of the NFS file system. Here is an example of the indirect map that is responsible for the directories in /home:
# /etc/auto_home - home directory map for automounter jdoe orem:/store/home/jdoe sdoe orem:/store/home/sdoe kdoe -bg srv-ss10:/home/kdoe
Here, the entries for jdoe, sdoe, and kdoe correspond to the directories /home/jdoe, /home/ sdoe, and /home/kdoe, respectively. The first two entries indicate that the automounter should mount the directories /home/jdoe and /home/sdoe from the NFS server orem, while the last one specifies that the directory /home/kdoe should be mounted from the NFS server srv-ss10. The last entry also demonstrates the use of options. Now that you have taken a look at an indirect map, you are ready to walk through what happens when you access a file on an NFS file system that is handled by the automounter. For example, consider the following command that accesses the file / home/jdoe/docs/book/ch17.doc:
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