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In this example, both mountd and nfsd are running, along with several other services, so the NFS daemon should have no problems executing. However, the RPL service is not active, since it is not displayed in the rpcinfo list, so x86 clients would not be able to use the local server as a boot server.
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On the client side, if you want to mount a volume that has been shared from an NFS server, you use the mount command. For example, if you want to mount the exported CD-ROM from carolina on the NFS client virginia, you would use the command
# mount -F nfs -o ro carolina:/cdrom /cdrom
Like the /etc/dfs/dfstab file, which records a list of volumes to be exported, the /etc/ vfstab file can contain entries for NFS volumes to be mounted from remote servers. For example, on the machine fairfax, if you wanted the /var/mail volume on carolina to be mounted locally as /var/mail, you would enter the following line in /etc/vfstab:
carolina:/var/mail /var/mail nfs yes rw
This line can be interpreted as a request to mount /var/mail from carolina read/write on the local mount point /var/mail as an NFS volume that should be mounted at boot time. If you make changes to the /etc/vfstab file on virginia, and you want to mount the /var/mail partition, you can use the command
# mount /var/mail
which will attempt to mount the remote /var/mail directory from the server carolina. Alternatively, you can use the command
# mountall
which will mount all partitions that are listed in /etc/vfstab but have not yet been mounted. This should identify and mount all available partitions. File systems can be unmounted by using the umount command. For example, if the /cdrom file system on carolina is mounted on virginia as /cdrom, then the command
# umount /cdrom
Part VI:
Services, Directories, and Applications
will unmount the mounted NFS volume. Alternatively, the unmountall command can be used, which unmounts all currently mounted NFS volumes. For example, the command
# umountall -F nfs
unmounts all volumes that are currently mounted through NFS. When a remote volume is mounted on a local client, it should be visible to the system just like a normal disk, as shown by df:
# df -k carolina:/cdrom 412456 341700 70756 83% /cdrom carolina:/var/mail 4194304 343234 3851070 8% /var/mail carolina:/opt/answerbook 2097152 1345634 750618 64% /opt/ answerbook
Enhancing Security
So far, NFS has been examined without consideration of the security implications of sharing a file system to clients. In a local intranet environment, with protection from a firewall, some administrators implement open NFS sharing, where client lists are not supplied to share commands to limit access to server volumes. The problem with this approach is spoofing: an external system may be able to pretend to be part of your local network, thereby gaining access to globally shared NFS volumes. Given that NFS authentication is usually based on mappings of usernames on the client to the server, if a spoofed system contains equivalent user accounts to those found on the server, then unauthorized clients will be able to read and write data at will. This is why it s critical to only share volumes to specific client systems, using the appropriate read-write or read-only designation. The other key parameter for the share command is sec, which specifies the type of authentication required to access server volumes. By default, the sys level is used, whereby usernames and groups are mapped between client and the server. Thus, the user lynda on the client will have the same access permissions as lynda on the server. However, other alternatives are available, depending on the relative risks involved in data loss. If sensitive data is being shared by an NFS server, it may be wise to implement a more sophisticated authentication method, including one based on DES public key cryptography (the dh level, standing for Diffie-Hellman) or the Kerberos 4 authentication method (the krb4 level). If a volume is exported with the dh or krb4 authentication levels, then all clients must use the method specified to access data on the volume specified. To support the dh or krb4 authentication levels, secure RPC must be running. User keys can be updated by using the chkey command. For more information on security, see 9.
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