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NFS performance is determined by a number of factors, including Server CPU speed, and number of server CPUs Server physical RAM and virtual RAM Server disk speed Server system load Server CacheFS capacity Server network interfaces Number of clients Speed of local network Domain Name Lookup Cache (DNLC) speed Many sites develop NFS services incrementally as the number of users grows, so does the number of CPUs, the amount of memory, the number of network interfaces, and the number of faster disks allocated to improving NFS performance. In addition, a number of software methods, including the CacheFS and DNLC settings, can be modified to improve data throughput. One of the best methods for determining how NFS is performing, from both a client and server perspective, is to use the nfsstat command to gather performance statistics over a period of weeks or months. In particular, counting the number of calls and bad calls can show the proportion of successful to unsuccessful requests, respectively, to the server. To run nfsstat on the server, use the following command:
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# nfsstat -s ... Server nfs: calls badcalls 575637455 3433 ...
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Here, you can see that the proportion of bad calls to the total number of calls is 3433 575637455, which is much less than 1 percent. After gathering statistics for each interval, the counters can be reset to zero by using the following command:
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nfsstat now provides output showing separate statistics for NFS versions 2, 3, and 4.
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The following commands are commonly used to install and manage NFS.
share
Table 26-1 shows the most common options for the share command.
mount
The main options available for mounting NFS file systems are shown in Table 26-2.
Parameter
Description Sets the username of unknown users to username Starts NFS logging Prevents applications from executing as setuid Prevents client access to subdirectories of exported server volumes Prevents writing to an exported file system Allows remote access by remote root users as the local root user Permits reading and writing to an exported file system Specifies the authentication level (sys, dh, or krb4)
NFS Server Options
anon=username log nosuid nosub ro root rw sec
TABLE 26-1
Option
Description Mounts a file system with read-only permissions. Mounts a file system with read/write permissions. No timeouts permitted the client will repeatedly attempt to make a connection. Timeouts permitted the client will attempt a connection, and give an error message if the connection fails. Attempts to mount a remote file system in the background if the connection fails.
NFS Client Options
ro rw hard soft bg
TABLE 26-2
26:
Network File System and Caching File System
Summary
In this chapter, you have examined how to share file systems with other servers by using NFS. New initiatives like WebNFS will ensure that NFS will not disappear, even though CIFS is now being used widely.
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Sendmail
lectronic mail was one of the first applications to be widely adopted across the Internet, and despite changes in technology and a shift toward information delivery via the Web, e-mail has managed to hold its ground. E-mail has undergone many changes in recent years: instead of plain-text messages being sent from commandline clients (or mail user agents, MUAs), there are many different mail protocols that enable remote clients to retrieve their e-mail from a centralized server (e.g., POP, IMAP), and multimedia content is now supported through Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME). Although desktop clients are technically capable of running mail servers, most organizations still prefer to run a single main mail server, running a mail-transport agent (MTA), such as the traditional sendmail daemon, or a newer replacement (e.g., qmail). The reason for this preference is that server systems, such as Solaris, have high uptime and better security features than the average desktop client, and because the security of mail services can be managed centrally. For example, if a security vulnerability is revealed in sendmail, then a patch can be freely downloaded from SunSolve and applied to the server, with minimal disruption to users. If everyone ran their own mail server, new security problems could take weeks if not months per incident to rectify, in a large organization. This chapter examines the background to how e-mail is addressed and delivered, and the configuration of the popular sendmail MTA. It then shifts focus to the client side, examining local and remote MUAs that use the Post Office Protocol (POP) and Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP) to retrieve their mail from a dedicated mail server.
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