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Draw UPC-A Supplement 5 in Software Copyright 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click here for terms of use.

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Part VI:
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FIGURE 31-1
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Tiger, as shown in the Network Neighborhood. If the entry for Tiger were expanded, several shared disks could potentially be mounted, if access rights were granted to the local user for the remote volumes, through Security Access Manager (SAM). In addition, printers attached to Tiger could be accessed, and print jobs could be managed using the Printers control panel. Figure 31-2 shows how easy it is to share file systems using Windows 2000: you simply right-click the drive you want to share in the Explorer window, select the Sharing tab, and define the authentication procedures and access rights for the shared volume. Consumer versions of Windows, such as XP, have a slightly different perspective, but the underlying operations are similar.
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In contrast, Sun developed the Network File System (NFS) protocol, which also allows file systems and printers to be shared with other clients. There are even Windows-based NFS clients that allow Windows clients to access Solaris NFS shares. However, the choice between using NFS and Samba in a heterogeneous network may be one of cost (PC-NFS costs money, Samba is free), but is more likely a question of numbers: Would you rather install NFS client software on hundreds of Windows systems that already have SMB support or install a single SMB-compliant server (like Samba) Using Samba as a centralized Windows server reduces the need to buy extra server licenses for file and print servers, because these functions could be provided by a Solaris Intel or Solaris SPARC system running Samba. Samba also runs on Linux systems. The following illustration shows a concrete example of how Samba can be useful on the (Microsoft Windows) client side: a remote file system (\ \elp\servlets) being exported using Samba running on Solaris allows a Microsoft Windows user to map a local drive
Part VI:
Services, Directories, and Applications
letter (K) to that file system. As far as the Windows client is concerned, the Solaris Samba volume is equivalent to a file system being shared from Windows NT Server or equivalent.
There are two main services that you must run in order to use Samba: the nmbd NetBIOS name lookup service and the smbd Samba daemon. The NetBIOS service is necessary to find local Windows clients and all SMB servers within the local domain. The smbd daemon takes care of the actual file- and print-sharing operations. A new process is created for every client that connects to the smbd, although only one nmbd is ever created.
NetBIOS Naming
Before file systems may be exported using the Samba daemon, you need to locate the client and server systems by using the NetBIOS name lookup protocol. The nmbd service runs on port 137 on Solaris, and it carries out the same functions as NetBIOS naming under Microsoft Windows. nmbd is a server that understands and can reply to NetBIOS over IP name service requests. nmbd also participates in the browsing protocols that make up the Windows Network Neighborhood view. In addition, you can use nmbd as a WINS (Windows Internet Name Server) server for resolution of hostnames. You can best gain an insight into how this operates by looking at some of the Windows NT commands that you can use to browse SMB shares and compare these commands with the equivalent Linux commands that perform the same tasks. In order to view a list of client systems that are currently accessing a Windows NT Server system, you would use this command:
C:\WINNT\SYSTEM32>nbtstat s
The following output would then be displayed:
NetBIOS Connection Table Local Name State In/Out Remote Host Input Output -------------------------------------------------------------------SYDNEY <00> Connected Out HUNTER <20> 101KB 15KB SYDNEY <00> Connected Out MELBOURNE <20> 1MB 100MB SYDNEY <00> Connected Out WGONG <20> 203KB 205KB
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