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Services, Directories, and Applications
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Remember that any of these hosts could be Samba servers running on Linux or Solaris, as well as Microsoft Windows servers and clients using native SMB networking. You can start the nmbd daemon with the following command:
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# /usr/local/samba/bin/nmbd D
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The D option specifies that the NetBIOS name service daemon should run as a standalone daemon rather than as a service through the Internet super daemon inetd.
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There are a number of ways to make a client connection to a Samba server. If you are using an NT Workstation system or similar, the Solaris Samba server should simply appear as a normal NT Server, with individual file systems listed as shares (as determined by the smb.conf file). In addition, Solaris file systems may be mapped as local NT drives. This makes Solaris Samba an ideal solution for servicing multiple NT Workstation systems as a reliable file server. Linux users can use the smbmount command to mount shared Solaris file systems, to maintain a single protocol for file sharing rather than, say, use NFS and Samba. To mount the answerbook share on the Solaris Samba server SYDNEY, for example, you would issue the following command from a Linux system:
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# smbmount //SYDNEY/answerbook /usr/local/answerbook
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This would mount the remote answerbook share onto the local file system on the mount point /usr/local/answerbook. Of course, the mount point would need to be created prior to mounting by using this command:
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# mkdir p /usr/local/answerbook
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To unmount the share once it is no longer required, you would use the following command:
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# smbumount /usr/local/answerbook
Solaris users who wish to access remote Samba shares (from Solaris, NT, or Linux servers) typically use the smbclient program, which runs from the command line and has a simple command set that is similar to that used by FTP. smbclient provides a very useful and compact way to upload, download, and delete files on a remote server. To make an initial connection, you would use a command of the form
# smbclient L system
31:
Samba
where system is the name of the remote Samba server. To determine which shares were available on the server SYDNEY, you would use this command:
# smbclient L SYDNEY Added interface ip=62.12.48.43 bcast=62.12.48.43 nmask=255.255.255.0 Domain=[EASTAUS] OS=[Unix] Server=[Samba 3.0.6] Sharename --------answerbook homes IPC$ Server --------SYDNEY Workgroup --------EASTAUS Type ---Disk Disk IPC Comment ------Sun Answerbooks User Home Directories IPC Service (Samba 3.0.6)
Comment ------Samba 3.0.6 Master ------WGONG
To make a connection to the share //SYDNEY/answerbook, use this command:
# smbclient //SYDNEY/answerbook
smbclient provides its own shell, so you would then be able to use one of the commands listed in Table 31-1 to list directory contents, change working directories, and upload and download files. Accessing a remote printer using Samba is slightly different: you must supply the P option to the smbclient command to identify that target share as a printer. For example, to mount the printer called hp on the Samba server SYDNEY, you would use the command
$ smbclient P //SYDNEY/hp TABLE 31-1
Basic smbclient Commands
Command cd <dir> dir <dir> get <file> ls <dir> mget <files> mput <files> put <file>
Action Changes working directory Displays directory contents Retrieves a single file from the server Displays directory contents Retrieves multiple files from the server Stores multiple files on the server Stores a single file on the server
Part VI:
Services, Directories, and Applications
You may then print a local file (such as address_book.txt) by using a command such as the following:
smb:\> print address_book.txt
You can then use the standard printing tools to examine print queues to determine whether the print job was successfully completed.
Procedures
The following procedures are required to configure the Samba daemon.
Configuring the Samba Daemon
You can start the smbd daemon with this command:
# /usr/local/samba/bin/smbd D
Again, the D option specifies that the NetBIOS name service daemon should run as a standalone daemon rather than as a service through the Internet super daemon inetd. Note that you should create a startup file for smbd and nmbd at the appropriate run level, if you want Samba to start at boot time. The Samba daemon has a special configuration file, called smb.conf. It is usually stored in the /usr/local/samba/lib directory. The smb.conf file can either be very short or very long, depending on the extent to which your local system requires customization and how many file systems need to be exported. A sample smb.conf file is shown here:
[global] workgroup = EASTAUS netbios name = SYDNEY server string = Solaris Samba Server V3.0.6 interfaces = 62.12.48.43 security = SHARE log file = /usr/local/samba/log/log.%m max log size = 500 socket options = TCP_NODELAY SO_RCVBUF=4096 SO_SNDBUF=4096 dns proxy = Yes guest account = guest hosts allow = localhost, 62.12.48.43/255.255.255.0 [printers] comment = SYDNEY HP Printer path = /var/spool/hp print ok = Yes browseable = Yes
31:
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