barcode dll for vb.net Copyright 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click here for terms of use. in Software

Making UPC Code in Software Copyright 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click here for terms of use.

Copyright 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click here for terms of use.
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for a Z80 processor were completely different from those for a 2650 CPU. This made it difficult for programmers to transfer their skills to other systems. A third level of abstraction was realized by early application development languages like C, in which the original UNIX kernel and, later, the Solaris kernels were written. Although C can contain inline assembly language, it was designed to be independent of the CPU on which its compiled instructions are executing. A compiler translates the English-like instructions written into binary code for a specific CPU, but the actual C source code is highly portable: as long as the program was written to conform to the ANSI standard for C, and as long as a compiler exists for the target platform, the source of a C application can be copied to that platform, compiled, and executed. C++ is a language based around C that has object-oriented data structures, which, at the time of its introduction, improved design processes and made implementation of complex software easier. However, this ideal was far from the reality: differences in C and C++ compilers across vendors made it very difficult to maintain compatibility, particularly with the rise of graphical user interfaces (GUIs). GUIs had to deal with creating binary code not only for different CPU types, but also for the broad spectrum of display devices on the market, which had little in common with each other. Particularly in the 1980s and early 1990s, it became fashionable to ditch cross-platform products like C to focus specifically on application development for a particular platform. For example, Microsoft developers used Visual Basic to create applications that would run only on the Microsoft Windows or MS-DOS platforms, and UNIX developers wrote applications for the X11 environment that were not necessarily designed to be cross-platform. Although these applications worked well for their target environments, it also meant that markets for software were constrained by the development platform. Many excellent desktop products never made it to UNIX, and several well-known data processing systems were unable to run on Windows. This situation seemed to reflect the frustration felt when development was performed using assembly language: different codebases were required for the same product on different platforms, and a separate development team was required for each platform. It was often very difficult to synchronize these efforts in any realistic way so, an application with the same version number in Microsoft Windows might have completely different functionality than an equivalent product for the MacOS. One solution to this problem was to begin looking at what went wrong with C and other third-generation languages that promised cross-platform run-time abilities. A solution was required that ensured that source distributions could be copied to a target platform and executed with little or no modification. One possibility was the Perl programming environment. Here, developers created Perl source, which could then be copied to any machine with a Perl interpreter, and it would be parsed and compiled just prior to execution. However, Perl (at that stage) was not object-oriented, and it did not have support for graphical environments. On the other hand, the Java programming language (which grew out of the Oak project) promised a full cross-platform graphical environment, which was based around the idea of a virtual machine. If programmers focused on writing applications based around an API (Application Programming Interface) for the virtual machine, the
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application would execute on any platform for which there was a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) that met the specifications developed by Sun Microsystems, the creator of Java. Java also featured single-process multithreading, which is very important in applications like Web servers, because traditional Web servers create a new process for each client connection, while a Java Web server runs in a single process and creates internal threads for each client to execute in. This is much more memory- and CPU-efficient than creating and destroying processes for each client in high-transaction-volume environments. Unlike Perl, Java applications were compiled on the development platform into an intermediate bytecode format, which could then be executed on any target platform. This reduced the run-time compilation overhead associated with Perl. Unfortunately, some vendors decided to innovate and create their own extensions to the JVM, which has created some uncertainty about the future of the Java language. In addition, Sun Microsystems has refused to hand the control of Java over to an independent body, so that an ANSI standard could be created, for example. Even with these caveats, however, Java is being rapidly adopted worldwide as the platform in which to deploy networked applications.
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