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The following concepts are required knowledge for starting up and shutting down a system.
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OpenBoot
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The OpenBoot PROM monitor is based on the Forth programming language and can be used to run Forth programs that perform the following functions: Boot the system, by using the boot command Perform diagnostics on hardware devices by using the diag command Test network connectivity by using the watch-net command
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Part I:
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Installation
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The OpenBoot PROM monitor has two prompts from which you can issue commands: the ok prompt and the > prompt. In order to switch from the > prompt to the ok prompt, you simply need to type n:
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> n ok
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Commands are typically issued from the ok prompt. These commands include boot, which boots a system either from the default system boot device or from an optional device specified at the prompt. Thus, if a system is at run-level 0 and needs to be booted, the boot command with no options specified will boot the system:
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ok boot Sun Ultra 5/10 UPA/PCI (UltraSPARC Iii 360 MHz), Keyboard Present OpenBoot Rev. 3.25, 512 MB memory installed, Serial #13018400. Ethernet address 5:2:12:c:ee:5a Host ID: 456543 Rebooting with command: Boot device: /iommu@f,e0000000/sbus@f,e0001000/espdma@f,400000/esp@f,8... SunOS Release 5.10 Version s10_48 64-bit Copyright (c) 1983-2003 by Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved configuring IPv4 interfaces: hme0. Hostname: winston The system is coming up. Please wait. checking ufs filesystems /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s1: is clean. NIS domainname is Cassowary.Net. starting rpc services: rpcbind keyserv ypbind done. Setting netmask of hme0 to 255.255.255.0 Setting default IPv4 interface for multicast: add net 224.0/ 4: gateway winston syslog service starting. Print services started. volume management starting. The system is ready. winston console login:
If you have modified your hardware configuration since the last boot and want the new devices to be recognized, you should always reboot using this command:
ok boot -r
This is equivalent to performing a reconfiguration boot using either of the following command sequences in a shell as the superuser:
# touch /reconfigure; sync; init 6
4:
Initialization, OpenBoot PROM, and Run Levels
# reboot -- -r
So far, we ve looked at automatic booting. However, sometimes, performing a manual boot is desirable, using the command boot -a, where you can specify parameters at each stage of the booting process. These parameters include the following: The path to the kernel that you wish to boot The path to the kernel s modules directory The path to the system file The type of the root file system The name of the root device For example, if you wished to use a different kernel, such as an experimental kernel, you would enter the following parameters during a manual boot:
Rebooting with command: boot -a Boot device: /pci@1f,0/pci@1,2/ide@1/disk@0,1:a File and args: -a Enter filename [kernel/sparcv9/unix]: kernel/experimental/unix Enter default directory for modules [/platform/SUNW,Sparc-20/kernel /platform/sun4m/kernel /kernel /usr/kernel]: Name of system file [etc/system]: SunOS Release 5.10 Version Generic 64-bit Copyright (c) 1983-2003 by Sun Microsystems, Inc. root filesystem type [ufs]: Enter physical name of root device [/pci@1f,0/pci@1,2/ide@1/disk@0,1:a]:
To accept the default parameters, simply press ENTER when prompted. Thus, to change only the path to the experimental kernel, you would enter kernel/experimental/unix at the Enter Filename prompt.
/sbin/init
Upon booting from OpenBoot, Solaris has several different modes of operation, which are known as run levels or init states, so called because the init command is often used to change run levels, although init-wrapper scripts (such as shutdown) are also used. These init states, which can be single- or multiuser, often serve different administrative purposes and are mutually exclusive (i.e., a system can only ever be in one init state). Typically, a Solaris system that is designed to stay up indefinitely cycles through a predefined series of steps in order to start all the software daemons necessary for the
Part I:
Installation
provision of basic system services, primary user services, and optional application services. These services are often provided only during the time that a Solaris system operates in a multiuser run state, with services being initialized by run control (rc) shell scripts. Usually, one run control script is created to start each system, user, or application service. Fortunately, many of these scripts are created automatically for administrators during the Solaris installation process. However, if you intend to install third-party software (such as a database server), you may need to create your own run control scripts in the /etc/init.d directory to start up these services automatically at boot time. This process is fully described in the Writing Control Scripts section, later in the chapter. If the system needs to be powered off for any reason (e.g., a scheduled power outage) or switched into a special maintenance mode to perform diagnostic tests, there is also a cycle of iterating through a predefined series of run control scripts to kill services and preserve user data. It is essential that you preserve this sequence of events so that data integrity is maintained. For example, operating a database server typically involves communication between a server-side, data-writing process and a daemon listener process, which accepts new requests for storing information. If the daemon process is not stopped prior to the data-writing process, it could accept data from network clients and store it in a cache, while the database has already been closed. This could lead to the database being shut down in an inconsistent state, potentially resulting in data corruption and/or record loss. It is essential that you apply your knowledge of shell scripting to rigorously manage system shutdowns and startups using run control scripts. In terms of system startup, Solaris has some similarities to Microsoft Windows and Linux. Although Solaris doesn t have an autoexec.bat or config.sys file, it does have a number of script files that are executed in a specific order to start services, just like Linux. These scripts are typically created in the /etc/init.d directory as Bourne shell scripts and are then symbolically linked into the run level directories. Just as Microsoft Windows has Safe Modes, Solaris supports a number of different modes of operation, from restricted, single-user modes to full, multiuser run levels. The complete set of run levels, with their respective run control script directories, is displayed in Table 4-1.
Run Level Description 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 S Hardware maintenance mode First multiuser state; NFS resources unavailable NFS resources available User-defined state Power down firmware state Operating system halted for reboot Administrative tasks and repair of corrupted file systems
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