barcode dll for vb.net Initialization, OpenBoot PROM, and Run Levels in Software

Drawing GS1 - 12 in Software Initialization, OpenBoot PROM, and Run Levels

Initialization, OpenBoot PROM, and Run Levels
UPC A Reader In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Printing UPC-A In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create UPCA image in Software applications.
across the network. To verify that the boot device has been set correctly to the primary network device, you can use the following command:
Scan UCC - 12 In None
Using Barcode scanner for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Painting UCC - 12 In C#
Using Barcode encoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create UPC Code image in .NET applications.
ok printenv boot-device boot-device net disk
Paint Universal Product Code Version A In .NET Framework
Using Barcode encoder for ASP.NET Control to generate, create UPC-A image in ASP.NET applications.
UPC A Creation In .NET
Using Barcode drawer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 2 image in .NET applications.
To set the default boot device to be the primary CD-ROM device, you would use the following command:
Universal Product Code Version A Maker In VB.NET
Using Barcode creation for .NET framework Control to generate, create UPC Symbol image in .NET framework applications.
UPCA Generation In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create UPC A image in Software applications.
ok setenv boot-device cdrom boot-device = cdrom
ANSI/AIM Code 128 Maker In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create USS Code 128 image in Software applications.
Make EAN-13 In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Software applications.
This is often useful when installing or upgrading the operating system. To verify that the boot device has been set correctly to cdrom, you can use the following command:
Bar Code Maker In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
Generating Bar Code In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
ok printenv boot-device boot-device cdrom disk
Monarch Encoder In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create Code-27 image in Software applications.
GTIN - 12 Reader In C#
Using Barcode reader for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
To set the default boot device to be the primary floppy drive, you would use the following command:
UCC - 12 Drawer In Objective-C
Using Barcode generator for iPhone Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in iPhone applications.
Encode GTIN - 128 In Java
Using Barcode generator for Java Control to generate, create GS1-128 image in Java applications.
ok setenv boot-device floppy boot-device = floppy
Decoding ANSI/AIM Code 39 In Java
Using Barcode scanner for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
EAN 13 Scanner In Java
Using Barcode decoder for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
To verify that the boot device has been set correctly to floppy, you can use the following command:
Paint Barcode In Java
Using Barcode encoder for Eclipse BIRT Control to generate, create bar code image in BIRT reports applications.
UPC Code Generation In None
Using Barcode drawer for Online Control to generate, create UPC Symbol image in Online applications.
ok printenv boot-device boot-device floppy disk
To set the default boot device to be the primary tape drive, you would use the following command:
ok setenv boot-device tape boot-device = tape
To verify that the boot device has been set correctly to tape, you can use the following command:
ok printenv boot-device boot-device tape disk
Part I:
Installation
Testing System Hardware
The test command is used to test specific hardware devices, such as the loopback network device. You could test this device by using this command:
ok test net Internal Loopback test - (OK) External Loopback test - (OK)
This indicates that the loopback device is operating correctly. You can also use the watch-clock command to test the clock device:
ok watch-clock Watching the 'seconds' register of the real time clock chip. It should be ticking once a second. Type any key to stop. 1 2 3
If the system is meant to boot across the network, but a boot attempt does not succeed, you can test network connectivity by using the watch-net program. This determines whether the system s primary network interface is able to read packets from the network it is connected to. The output from the watch-net program looks like this:
Internal Loopback test - succeeded External Loopback test - succeeded Looking for Ethernet packets. '.' is a good packet. 'X' is a bad packet. Type any key to stop ......X.........XXXX..... .XX............
In this case, a number of packets are marked as bad, even though the system has been connected successfully to the network. This can occur because of network congestion. In addition to the watch-net command, the OpenBoot PROM monitor can perform a number of other diagnostic tests. For example, you can detect all the SCSI devices attached to the system by using the probe-scsi command. The output of probe-scsi looks like this:
ok probe-scsi Target 1 Unit 0 Disk SUN0104 Copyright (C) 1995 Sun Microsystems All rights reserved Target 1 Unit 0 Disk SUN0207 Copyright (C) 1995 Sun Microsystems All rights reserved
4:
Initialization, OpenBoot PROM, and Run Levels
Here, you can see that two SCSI disks have been detected. If any other disks or SCSI devices were attached to the chain, they have not been detected, indicating a misconfiguration or hardware error. Because most modern SPARC systems also ship with a PCI bus, you can display the appropriate PCI devices by using the probe-pci and probe-pci-slot commands.
Creating and Removing Device Aliases
The OpenBoot PROM monitor is able to store certain environment variables in nonvolatile RAM (NVRAM) so that they can be used from boot to boot by using the nvalias command. For example, to set the network device to use RARP for booting, you would use the following command:
ok nvalias net /pci@1f,4000/network@1,1:rarp
This output indicates that booting using the network device, as shown in the following example, would use the /pci@1f,4000/network@1,1 device to boot the system across the network:
ok boot net
However, if you wanted to use the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) to retrieve the host s IP address when booting, instead of using RARP, you would use the following command:
ok boot net:dhcp
To remove the alias from NVRAM, you simply use the nvunalias command:
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.