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$ touch helloworld.pl
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Next, set the permissions on the file to be executable:
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$ chmod +x helloworld.pl
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$ vi helloworld.pl
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and insert a directive to the shell to execute the PERL interpreter contained in the /usr/ bin directory (it may also be installed in /usr/local/bin):
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#!/usr/bin/perl
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Next, insert the PERL code that actually constitutes the program:
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print "Hello World\n";
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Finally, save the file in the current directory and execute it on the command line:
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$ ./helloworld.pl Hello World!
Part II:
System Essentials
Like most programming languages, PERL uses variables to store values that can change over time. These are represented as names with the $ symbol preceding them. So, for example, if you develop a program that prints the balance of a checking account, you might create and assign values to variables with names like $date, $transaction, $amount, and $balance. You can use variables to store just about any kind of information, including simple messages. A revision of the Hello World program code using a variable to store the message you want to print out would look like this:
#!/usr/bin/perl $message="Hello World!"; print $message, "\n";
When you run this program, you get exactly the same output as before,
$ ./helloworld.pl Hello World!
because the comma symbol here acts to concatenate the string contained in the $message variable and the newline command contained between the quotes directly after the comma symbol. Variables in PERL do not necessarily just contain strings; they can also store numeric values, and PERL has a series of operators that you can use to perform arithmetic operations on variables. For example, you may want to perform a simple addition:
#!/usr/bin/perl $val1=10; $val2=20; print $val1, " + ", $val2, " = ", $val1+$val2, "\n";
This program assigns the value of 10 to the variable $val1, and the value of 20 to the variable $val2. It then prints the addition expression that is going to be evaluated, and then actually performs the addition of $val1 and $val2 by using the + operator. Here s the result, which is unsurprising:
$ ./addition.pl 10 + 20 = 30
Other operators for PERL include the following:
* / == !=
Subtraction operator Multiplication operator Division operator Equivalence operator Nonequivalence operator
6:
Te x t P r o c e s s i n g a n d E d i t i n g
< > <= >=
Less-than operator, also called le Greater-than operator, also called gt Less-than or equal-to operator, also known as le Greater-than or equal-to operator, also known as ge
So far, we ve only seen the special escape character \n, which comes from C and means newline character. It s also possible to use other escape characters from C, such as \t, which is the tab escape character. Let s have a look at the results of combining the tab escape character to produce tabulated output, and then examine other arithmetic operators from PERL:
#!/usr/bin/perl $val1=10; $val2=20; print $val1, " + print $val1, " print $val1, " * print $val1, " /
", ", ", ",
$val2, $val2, $val2, $val2,
" " " "
=\t", =\t", =\t", =\t",
$val1+$val2, $val1-$val2, $val1*$val2, $val1/$val2,
"\n"; "\n"; "\n"; "\n";
Once again, the results are as expected, with the result column being separated from the expression by a tab character:
$ ./operators.pl 10 + 20 = 30 10 - 20 = -10 10 * 20 = 200 10 / 20 = 0.5
Other escape characters commonly used in PERL include the following:
\a \b \f \r \\ \"
Terminal bell Backspace Form feed Return Inserts \ as a character literal Inserts " as a character literal
In many cases, applications require that some kind of decision be taken on the basis of the current value of a specific variable. One way of making this decision is to use an if/else construct, which separates two blocks of code, one that is executed if a statement is true, and one that is executed if a statement is false. For example, imagine that you want to test whether a particular file exists. There are many reasons why you would want to do this. If a password file does not exist, for example, you might want to notify
Part II:
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