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{ print "<b>Invalid shell:</b> ".$i."<br>\n"; } }
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Command Reference
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The following commands are used to process text.
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The standard options for sed are shown here:
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n e filename V
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Prevents display of pattern space Executes the script contained in the file filename Displays the version number
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The standard POSIX options for awk are shown here:
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f filename F field v x=y W lint W lint-old W traditional W version
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Where filename is the name of the awk file to process Where field is the field separator Where x a variable, and y is a value Turns on lint checking Uses old-style lint checking Enforces traditional usage Displays the version number
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Summary
In this chapter, we have examined basic text editing and command-line processing, as well as more advanced text-processing utilities like sed and awk. As predecessors to PERL, sed and awk were widely used within shell scripts (see next chapter) to perform pattern analysis and matching.
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Shells, Scripts, and Scheduling
Graphical user interfaces (GUIs) are an increasingly popular metaphor for interacting with computer systems, including the GNOME GUI included with Solaris 10. However, character user interfaces (CUIs) are a core feature of Solaris 10, because they provide a programmatic environment in which commands can be executed. Many operations on Solaris systems are performed in the context of a script, whether starting services at boot time or processing text to produce a report. Indeed, one of the key advantages of UNIX and UNIX-like environments over non-UNIX systems is the capability to combine large numbers of small commands in a CUI, in conjunction with pipes and filters, to create complex command sets that perform repetitive tasks that can be scheduled to run at a specific time.
Key Concepts
The following key concepts are required knowledge for understanding shells, scripts, and the scheduling of operations.
The Shell
All shells have a command prompt the prompt usually tells the user which shell is currently being used, the user who owns the shell, and the current working directory. For example, the following prompt
usually indicates that the current user has superuser privileges. Shell prompts are completely customizable the default for the Bourne Again Shell (bash) is just the name of the shell:
bash-2.05$
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Part II:
System Essentials
When you start a new terminal window from within the CDE, a shell is automatically spawned for you. This will be the same shell that is specified in your /etc/passwd entry:
apache:x:1003:10:apache user:/usr/local/apache:/usr/local/bin/bash
In this case, the apache user has bash set as the default. To be a valid login shell, /usr/ local/bin/bash must also be included in the shells database (stored in the file /etc/shells). If the default shell prompt is not to your liking, you can easily change its format by setting two environment variables PS1 and PS2. I cover environment variables in the Setting Environment Variables section later in the chapter. For now, simply note that the Solaris environment space is similar to that found in Linux and Windows. For example, to set the prompt to display the username and host, you would use the following command in bash:
PS1='\u@\H> '; export PS1
The prompt displayed by the shell would then look like this:
oracle@db>
Many users like to display their current username, hostname, and current working directory, which can be set using the following command:
PS1='\u@\H:\w> '; export PS1
When executed, this shell prompt is changed to
oracle@db:/usr/local>
where oracle is the current user, db is the hostname, and /usr/local is the current working directory. A list of different customization options for shell prompts is given in Table 7-1. At the shell prompt, you enter commands in the order in which you intend for them to be executed. For example, to execute the admintool from the command prompt, you would type this command:
oracle@db:/usr/sbin> ./admintool
The ./ in this example indicates that the admintool application resides in the current directory you could also execute the application using this command:
oracle@db:/usr/sbin> /usr/sbin/admintool
7:
Shells, Scripts, and Scheduling
Setting
Description ASCII beep character Date string Short hostname Full hostname Shell name Current time (12-hour format) Current time (24-hour format) Current time (A.M./P.M. format) Username Shell version Shell version with revision Command history number Privilege indicator Username and privilege indicator Username, command history number, and privilege indicator
Output beep Wed Sep 6 www www.paulwatters.com bash 10:53:44 10:53:55 10:54 A.M. Root 2.05 2.05.0 223 # root# root:173:#
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