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63: S_IFREG mode:0600 dev:174,2 ino:990890 UID:6049 GID:1 size:3210 O_RDWR|O_APPEND|O_LARGEFILE FD_CLOEXEC
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In addition, it is possible to obtain the current working directory of the target process by using the pwdx command:
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$ /usr/proc/bin/pwdx 29081 29081: /home/paul
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If you need to examine the process tree for all parent and child processes containing the target PID, you can use the ptree command. This is useful for determining dependencies between processes that are not apparent by consulting the process list:
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$ /usr/proc/bin/ptree 29081 247 /usr/dt/bin/dtlogin -daemon 28950 /usr/dt/bin/dtlogin -daemon 28972 /bin/ksh /usr/dt/bin/Xsession 29012 /usr/dt/bin/sdt_shell -c unset DT; DISPLAY=lion:0; 29015 ksh -c unset DT; DISPLAY=lion:0; /usr/dt/bin/dt 29026 /usr/dt/bin/dtsession 29032 dtwm 29079 /usr/dt/bin/dtterm 29081 /bin/ksh 29085 /usr/local/bin/bash 29230 /usr/proc/bin/ptree 29081
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Here, ptree has been executed from bash, which was started from the Korn shell (ksh), spawned from the dtterm terminal window, which was spawned from the dtwm window manager, and so on. Although many of these proc tools will seem obscure, they are often very useful when trying to debug process-related application errors, especially in large applications like database management systems.
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Using the lsof Command
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The lsof command (lsof stands for list open files ) lists information about files that active processes running on Solaris currently have open. The lsof command is not included in the Solaris distribution; however, the current version can always be downloaded from ftp://vic.cc.purdue.edu/pub/tools/unix/lsof. What can you use lsof for The answer largely depends on how many problems you encounter that relate to processes and files. Often, administrators are interested in knowing which processes are currently using a target file or files from a particular directory. This can occur when a file is locked by one application, for example, but is required by another application (again, a situation in which two database instances simultaneously attempt to write to a database system s data files is one example in
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Process Management
which this might happen). If you know the path to a file of interest, you can use lsof to determine which processes are using files in that directory. To examine the processes that are using files in the /tmp file system, use this:
$ lsof /tmp COMMAND PID ssion 338 (unknown) 345 le 2295 le 2299
USER pwatters pwatters pwatters pwatters
FD txt txt txt txt
TYPE DEVICE SIZE/OFF VREG 0,1 271596 VREG 0,1 271596 VREG 0,1 271596 VREG 0,1 271596
NODE NAME 471638794 /tmp 471638794 /tmp 471638794 /tmp 471638794 /tmp
(swap) (swap) (swap) (swap)
Obviously, there s a bug in the routines that obtain the command name (the first four characters are missing!), but since the PID is correct, this is enough information to identify the four applications that are currently using files in /tmp. For example, dtsession (PID 338) manages the CDE session for the user pwatters, who is using a temporary text file in the /tmp directory. Another common problem that lsof is used for, with respect to the /tmp file system, is the identification of processes that continue to write to unlinked files: thus, space is being consumed, but it may appear that no files are growing any larger! This confusing activity can be traced back to a process by using lsof. However, rather than using lsof on the /tmp directory directly, you would need to examine the root directory (/) on which /tmp is mounted. After finding the process that is writing to an open file, you can kill the process. If the size of a file is changing across several different sampling epochs (e.g., by running the command once a minute), you ve probably found the culprit:
# lsof / COMMAND (unknown) (unknown) (unknown) sadm sadm sadm sadm sadm
PID 1 1 1 62 62 62 62 62
USER root root root root root root root root
FD txt txt txt txt txt txt txt txt
TYPE DEVICE SIZE/OFF NODE NAME VREG 102,0 446144 118299 / (/dev/dsk/c0d0s0) VREG 102,0 4372 293504 / (/dev/dsk/c0d0s0) VREG 102,0 173272 293503 / (/dev/dsk/c0d0s0) VREG 102,0 954804 101535 / (/dev/dsk/c0d0s0) VREG 102,0 165948 101569 / (/dev/dsk/c0d0s0) VREG 102,0 16132 100766 / (/dev/dsk/c0d0s0) VREG 102,0 8772 100765 / (/dev/dsk/c0d0s0) VREG 102,0 142652 101571 / (/dev/dsk/c0d0s0)
One of the restrictions on mounting a file system is that you can t unmount that file system if files are open on it: if files are open on a file system and it is dismounted, any changes made to the files may not be saved, resulting in data loss. Looking at a process list may not always reveal which processes are opening which files, and this can be very frustrating if Solaris refuses to unmount a file system because some files are open. Again, lsof can be used to identify the processes that are opening files on a specific file system.
Part II:
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