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Similarly, the following configuration disables the ftp, telnet, shell, login, exec, comsat, talk, uucp, and finger services in /etc/services:
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Don t forget that you need to HUP the inetd daemon for these changes to be enabled.
Checking User and Group Identification
The concept of the user is central to Solaris all processes and files on a Solaris system are owned by a particular user and are assigned to a specific user group. No data or activities on the system may exist without first establishing a valid user or group. Managing users and groups as a Solaris administrator can be a challenging activity you will be responsible for assigning all the privileges granted or denied to a user or group of users, and many of these permissions carry great risk. For example, a user with an inappropriate privilege level may execute inappropriate commands as the superuser, causing damage to your system. You can determine which user is currently logged in from a terminal session by using the id command:
$ id uid=1001(natashia) gid=10(dialup)
The output shows that the currently logged-in user is natashia, with UID=1001. In addition, the current group of natashia is a dialup group with GID=10. It is possible for the user and group credentials to change during a single terminal session. For example, if the su facility is used effectively to become the superuser, the UID and GID associated with the current terminal session will also change:
$ su root Password: # id uid=0(root) gid=1(other)
Here, the root user (UID=0) belonging to the group other (GID=1) has spawned a new shell with full superuser privileges.
9:
System Security
You can obtain a list of all groups that a user belongs to by using the groups command. For example, to view all the groups that the root user belongs to, use the following command:
# groups root other root bin sys adm uucp mail tty lp nuucp daemon
Protecting the Superuser Account
You ve just examined how to use the su facility to invoke superuser privileges from an unprivileged account. The user with UID=0 (typically the root user) has unlimited powers to act on a Solaris system. The root user can perform the following potentially dangerous functions: Add, delete, or modify all other user accounts Read and write all files, and create new ones Add or delete devices to the system Install new system software Read everyone s e-mail Snoop network traffic for usernames and passwords of other systems on the LAN Modify all system logs to remove all traces of superuser access Pretend to be an unprivileged user and access their accounts on other systems where login access is authenticated against a username These powers combine to make the root account sound rather sinister: however, many of these activities are legitimate and necessary system administration routines that are undertaken daily. For example, network traffic can be snooped to determine where network outages are occurring, and copying user files to backup tapes every night is generally in everyone s best interest. However, if an intruder gains root access, they are free to roam the system, deleting or stealing data, removing or adding user accounts, or installing Trojan horses that can transparently modify the way that your system operates. One way to protect against an authorized user gaining root access is to use a hard-toguess root password. This makes it difficult for a cracker to use a password-cracking program to guess your password successfully. The optimal password is a completely random string of alphanumeric and punctuation characters. In addition, the root password should never be written down unless it is locked in the company safe, nor should it be told to anyone who doesn t need to know it. The root password must usually be entered twice just in case you should happen to make a typographical error, as the characters that you type are masked on the screen.
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