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Metropolitan access is characterized by the deployment of ring architectures, used for the aggregation and transport of lower speed traffic. For example, a carrier might deploy a 10-Gbps metropolitan ring throughout a large city, as shown in Figure 7-13, which would then interconnect to lower speed, 2.5-Gbps access facilities either point-to-point circuits or rings. SONET/SDH, as well as DWDM, are key technologies in this environment; ILECs/Incumbent PTTs and CLECs/City Carriers are involved in this segment of the marketplace, where they serve as peering points in the network, providing high-speed interfaces to multiple protocols, technologies, and companies. Some service providers have reinvented themselves as broadband access carriers, offering a wide array of high-bandwidth access options including DSL, cable modems, and wireless solutions. These broadband access providers face a different set of issues than traditional carriers. First, they do not have a great deal of experience managing high-bandwidth access services and have never seen the tremendous growth that currently characterizes the market. Second, they tend to be quicker and more nimble than their more traditional competitors, making technology decisions that are in the best interest of their customers based on economies of scale and the potential to generate added revenue in innovative ways. These companies must deploy the most current technologies and must ensure scalability if they are to meet the growing demands of their customer base.
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Figure 7-13 Backbone feeder application. 10G 10G 10 Gbps BLSR 10G 10G OC-12 OC-12 UPSRs OC-12 DS-3 and other tributaries 10G
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Many believe that these companies may eventually own the customer as broadband access catches on. They are deploying high-speed architectures designed to support the requirements of telecommuters, remote office installations, wireless business access, Gigabit Ethernet interoffice communications, and regional ISPs. For example, a carrier might deploy an OC-48/STM-16 metro ring that provides transport for traffic that originates on DSL-equipped local loops, interconnecting remote workers with a corporate network elsewhere in the metro area. Another carrier might deploy an all-optical metro infrastructure to support the huge traffic increases between base stations that result from the deployment of third-generation wireless services. As data access over cable becomes more common, a carrier might build a high-speed access network designed to aggregate and transport traffic between cable customers and an ATM backbone. As wireless local loop technologies such as the Local Multipoint Distribution Service (LMDS), shown in Figure 7-14, find their way into the business access domain, broadband metro carriers will roll out high-speed rings to satisfy the demands of these and other similar services. Similarly, a regional ISP, with a need to connect to multiple Network Access Points (NAPs) and database locations, may be served by a broadband metro carrier s 10-Gbps metropolitan ring, which provides transport for traffic that originates on low-speed services such as OC-48/STM-16, OC-3/STM-1, and traditional TDM services. Finally, a metropolitan ring can be used to interconnect corporate local area networks (LANs). Several vendors have deployed multiprotocol multiplexers that enable Gigabit Ethernet to be transported across a 10-Gbps ring clearly an application with promise, given the widespread deployment of Ethernet technology. This is illustrated in Figure 7-15. Metropolitan transport is precisely what the name implies: that segment of the transport market that delivers the high-speed rings used to aggregate and move lower speed traffic between locations or onward to a wide area transport environment. Finally, metropolitan enterprise is the realm of innovative access techniques designed to provide high-bandwidth solutions for businesses.
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