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SONET and SDH Applications
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Telseon recently made news in the trade journals when it declared itself to be the first bandwidth provider to place provisioning functions in the hands of customers. This allowed them to self-provision virtual connections and gave them the capability to modify bandwidth as required in real-time. Telseon also offers business-to-business connectivity, which enables any company on Telseon s metro network to create a connection and offer it to any other company on the company s network. Once network access has been established, Telseon enables customers to add and change connections and increase bandwidth on demand as they require, all using Telseon s Web-based IP provisioning system. The company offers three levels of service:
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Point-to-point. Connects two sites, either within your own network or from your network to a service provider or business partner network. Point-to-multipoint. Service providers connect to multiple customer sites or for multicast distribution. Multipoint-to-multipoint. A single organization connects to campuses, multiple carrier POPs, or trading communities.
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The Multiservice Optical Core
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The multiservice optical core network looks like one of those Russian mamuschka dolls a series of nested service layers that together create a multiservice network. This network is designed to transport a wide variety of service types, including
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ATM MPLS-enhanced IP DSL Frame relay Packetized voice Cable modem traffic
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SONET and SDH Applications
Private line Wireless VPN services
The network is most likely deployed over ATM as the switching infrastructure. This results in a number of advantages, including low latency/delay characteristics for transported traffic, the capability to prioritize, and enhancements to an otherwise all-IP infrastructure. All of the services listed here benefit from the modern core design. The advantages are as follows:
ATM. Multiprotocol transport support, QoS preservation, and globally-accepted standards MPLS-enhanced IP. Extremely efficient use of sometimes scarce addressing space, reuse of existing routing protocols, and scalability DSL. High-bandwidth access to both intranet and Internet services over existing copper facilities and traffic aggregation over ATM access and backbone services Frame relay. Reliance on standards-based frame relay bearer service (FRBS) and the ability to offer end-to-end seamless QoS as a competitive advantage Packetized voice. Low-delay architecture associated with ATM that enables voice services to be given highest priority service and permits planning for circuit-to-packet migration strategies Cable modem traffic. Capability to deliver granular QoS, capability to offer and provision high-bandwidth virtual circuit service, and makes high-speed Internet access possible Private line. Multiprotocol transport and differentiable QoS Wireless. Similar to packet voice with low delays, scalability, and highquality predictable transports VPN services. Efficient use of private and public IP addressing space, reuse of existing routing protocols, the capability to create custom address plans, and scalability
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SONET and SDH Applications
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Optical Area Network
The optical area network (OAN) is the name given to the optical network infrastructure that provides gradable transport for a wide array of services including
Storage area networking (SAN) Web content hosting Bandwidth trading (discussed earlier) Video services Data center connectivity
The reader should be able to see that these services are entirely contentdriven and are therefore highly dependent on varying degrees of QoS. The deployment of these services is causing a massive reinvention of the network. The number of network users is climbing rapidly. Applications are being created that require more and more storage and transport bandwidth and that are often outsourced (which puts an additional burden on the network). Web pages are becoming far more graphics-intensive and therefore bandwidth-hungry, and the Web is becoming the delivery medium for a volley of unanticipated services including television, video on demand, MP3 music, soccer games, and more. The end result of this is that person-toperson communication is no longer the most common model for traffic. Instead, the model is rapidly becoming person-to-server, server-to-server, and data center-to-data center. The consequences of this evolving service infrastructure are significant, particularly for the data center environment (which in effect includes the SAN, Web hosting, bandwidth trading, and some video content environments). Consider the characteristics of the typical modern data center today. They have evolved from centralized, hierarchical roots and are saddled with the vestiges of older technologies. They house large numbers of services, all interconnected with standard 10-Mbps Ethernet. They provide support and sustenance for LANs, SANs, and WANs. They support a variety of lessthan-efficient legacy WAN interfaces that are left over from earlier times but that are deeply embedded and therefore cannot be removed. They are forced to run and support multiple redundant software architectures, and finally they must manage multiple database farms that do not communicate to one another.
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
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