vb.net qr code SONET Basics in Software

Encode Code39 in Software SONET Basics

SONET Basics
Scan Code39 In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Create Code 39 In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create Code 3 of 9 image in Software applications.
SONET Basics
Code 39 Full ASCII Decoder In None
Using Barcode reader for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Generate Code-39 In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode generator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Code 3/9 image in VS .NET applications.
Figure 2-3 The layers of the SONET overhead.
Encoding Code 39 Extended In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode encoder for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code-39 image in ASP.NET applications.
Paint Code39 In VS .NET
Using Barcode maker for .NET Control to generate, create Code39 image in .NET framework applications.
DS-3
Code 3/9 Generator In VB.NET
Using Barcode maker for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Code39 image in VS .NET applications.
Print Data Matrix In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create ECC200 image in Software applications.
Figure 2-4 The layered nature of SONET overhead.
Encode USS Code 128 In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 128 image in Software applications.
Creating Barcode In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
POH LOH SOH SOH LOH SOH SOH
Code 39 Generator In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create Code-39 image in Software applications.
EAN-13 Supplement 5 Drawer In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in Software applications.
POH LOH SOH
Generating 4-State Customer Barcode In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create 4-State Customer Barcode image in Software applications.
Making Code 128 In Java
Using Barcode generator for Java Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set B image in Java applications.
The SONET Frame
Bar Code Generator In .NET Framework
Using Barcode encoder for .NET Control to generate, create barcode image in .NET framework applications.
Barcode Maker In VS .NET
Using Barcode maker for Reporting Service Control to generate, create bar code image in Reporting Service applications.
Keep in mind once again that we are doing nothing more complicated than building a T-1 frame with an attitude. Recall that the T-1 frame comprised 24 eight-bit channels (samples from each of 24 incoming data streams) plus a single bit of overhead. In SONET, we have a similar construct much more channel capacity and much more overhead is available, but it has the same functional concept.
Printing Code128 In VS .NET
Using Barcode creation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code-128 image in ASP.NET applications.
Bar Code Maker In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create bar code image in ASP.NET applications.
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
EAN-13 Supplement 5 Encoder In Java
Using Barcode creator for Java Control to generate, create EAN-13 Supplement 5 image in Java applications.
Code-39 Printer In None
Using Barcode generation for Font Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in Font applications.
SONET Basics
2
Figure 2-5 shows the fundamental SONET frame. This frame is known as a Synchronous Transport Signal, Level One (STS-1). It is 9 bytes tall and 90 bytes wide for a total of 810 bytes of transported data including both user payload and overhead. The first three columns of the frame are the Section and Line Overhead, known collectively as the Transport Overhead. The bulk of the frame itself, to the left, is the synchronous payload envelope (SPE), which is the container area for the user data that is being transported. The data, previously identified as the payload, begins somewhere in the payload envelope. The actual starting point will vary, as we will see later. The Path Overhead begins when the payload begins; because it is unique to the payload itself, it travels closely with the payload. The first byte of the payload is the first byte of the Path Overhead. A word about nomenclature: two distinct terms, Synchronous Transport Signal (STS) and Optical Carrier Level (OC), are often used (incorrectly) interchangeably. They are used interchangeably because although an STS-1 and an OC-1 are both 51.84 Mbps signals, one is an electrically-framed signal (STS) whereas the other describes an optical signal (OC). Keep in mind that the signals SONET transports usually originate at an electrical source such as a T-1. This data must be collected and multiplexed at an electrical level before being handed over to the optical transport system. The optical networking part of the SONET system speaks in terms of OC. Let s pause for a moment to consider the actual transmission of a SONET frame. Several years ago, while teaching a course on basic telecom-
90 Bytes
Figure 2-5 A SONET frame showing the principal components.
9 Bytes
Payload Envelope POH
LOH Payload
Transport Overhead (SOH + LOH)
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
SONET Basics
SONET Basics
munications to a group of telecommunications lawyers, one of them asked me a very interesting question. While examining the 810-byte SONET frame shown in Figure 2-6, she asked, how does SONET multiplex those nine rows to get them into the transmission facility It took me a moment to understand her question, but when I finally did I realized that the question deserved an answer because she was probably the first person to articulate a question that many before her had no doubt wondered about. The SONET frame is transmitted serially on a row-by-row basis, as shown in Figure 2-7. For purposes of clarity, I have simplified the frame by separating the rows and left-justifying them. The SONET multiplexer transmits (and therefore receives) the first byte of row one, all the way to the 90th byte of row one, then wraps to transmit the first byte of row two, all the way to the 90th byte of row two, and so on, until all 810 bytes have been transmitted. We draw the SONET frame structure as a 9-by-90-byte box, because if we were to draw it as a linear transmission stream, the frame would wrap completely around the classroom and require multiple pages at the bottom
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.