barcode generator in vb.net codeproject Switching in the Optical Domain in Software

Drawing Code 39 in Software Switching in the Optical Domain

Switching in the Optical Domain
Decoding USS Code 39 In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Creating USS Code 39 In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create Code 39 image in Software applications.
The principal form of optical switching is really nothing more than a very sophisticated digital cross-connect system. In the early days of data net-
ANSI/AIM Code 39 Recognizer In None
Using Barcode reader for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Code 3 Of 9 Generation In C#.NET
Using Barcode generator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in .NET applications.
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Paint Code 3 Of 9 In .NET
Using Barcode generator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in ASP.NET applications.
Draw USS Code 39 In .NET
Using Barcode creator for .NET framework Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in .NET framework applications.
Overview of Optical Technology
Painting Code 3/9 In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode creator for .NET framework Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in .NET framework applications.
DataMatrix Printer In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Software applications.
Overview of Optical Technology
Create EAN / UCC - 13 In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create UPC - 13 image in Software applications.
Barcode Maker In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
working, dedicated facilities were created by manually patching the end points of a circuit at a patch panel, thus creating a complete four-wire circuit. Beginning in the 1980s, digital cross-connect devices such as AT&T s Digital Access and Cross-Connect (DACS) became common, replacing the time-consuming, expensive, and error-prone manual process. The digital cross-connect is really a simple switch, designed to establish long-term temporary circuits quickly, accurately, and inexpensively. Figure 4-39 illustrates the cross-connect. Enter the world of optical networking. Traditional cross-connect systems worked fine in the optical domain, provided no problem occurred going through the O-E-O conversion process. This, however, was one of the aspects of optical networking that network designers wanted to eradicate from their functional requirements. Thus, the optical cross-connect switch was born. The first of these to arrive on the scene was Lucent Technologies LambdaRouter. Based on a switching technology called Micro Electrical Mechanical System (MEMS), the LambdaRouter was the world s first all-optical cross-connect device. MEMS relies on micro-mirrors, an array of which is shown in Figure 4-40. The mirrors can be configured at various angles to ensure that an incoming lambda strikes one mirror, reflects off a fixed mirrored surface, strikes another movable mirror, and is then reflected out an egress fiber. The LambdaRouter is now commercially deployed and offers speed, a relatively small footprint, bit rate, and protocol transparency, non-blocking architecture, and highly developed database management. Fundamentally, these devices are very high-speed, high-capacity switches or cross-connect devices. They are not routers because they do not perform Layer 3 functions. All of the major manufacturers, however, including Lucent, Nortel, Ciena, Agilent, and Juniper, have announced initiatives designed to craft true optical routers, and Layer 3 protocols such as MPLS, OSRP, and GMPLS are being tested at the time of this writing which will purportedly add routing functionality to the all-optical domain.
GTIN - 12 Drawer In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create UPC Symbol image in Software applications.
ANSI/AIM Code 128 Generation In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create USS Code 128 image in Software applications.
Figure 4-39 Schematic diagram of cross-connect system.
MSI Plessey Maker In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create MSI Plessey image in Software applications.
Reading EAN13 In None
Using Barcode scanner for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Making 2D Barcode In Java
Using Barcode creation for Java Control to generate, create Matrix Barcode image in Java applications.
UCC.EAN - 128 Printer In None
Using Barcode generator for Font Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in Font applications.
Overview of Optical Technology
UPC Code Reader In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode scanner for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
Encode Code 3/9 In C#
Using Barcode creation for .NET framework Control to generate, create Code-39 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Figure 4-40 MEMS array (Courtesy Lucent Technologies).
ECC200 Generator In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode encoder for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in ASP.NET applications.
Painting Barcode In None
Using Barcode drawer for Office Word Control to generate, create barcode image in Word applications.
4
Years ago when I worked for the telephone company, I was often asked, how does it all work My most common response was, it s all smoke and mirrors. Well, the mirror part is certainly true. In our next chapter, we turn our attention to optical switching with a discussion of one critical component, Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM).
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Source: Sonet / SDH Demystified
CHAPTER
Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM)
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM)
5
The Winchester Mystery House in San Jose, California is a 160-room, Victorian mansion designed and built by Sarah Winchester, the wife of William Winchester, son of the manufacturer of the repeating rifle that bears his name. Fifteen years after marrying William, he died of tuberculosis, leaving Sarah a widow. Upset by the death of her husband, Sarah took the advice of friends and family and consulted spirit guides as a way to help lessen the pain of loss. They convinced Sarah that the spirits of those who had been killed by Winchester rifles haunted her, and that those same spirits were exacting revenge on the Winchester family. Furthermore, they convinced Sarah that those same spirits had placed a curse on her with every intention of haunting her for the rest of her life. The only saving grace was that Sarah s advisors informed her that she could evade the curse by moving from Illinois to California, buying a house, and beginning an endless process of addition and remodeling, creating a warren of doorways and portals throughout the house that would confuse and mislead the spirits. Furthermore, they informed her that as long as she never interrupted the construction process, she would enjoy immortality. So in 1884, she moved to San Jose, purchased an eight-room farmhouse on a large piece of land and immediately began her endless building project. Figure 5-1 shows some of the house s remarkable details.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.