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The program will continue running at the next statement.
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GOTO <target> The program will jump to a section within the host language that is named in the <target> placeholder.
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Now that we ve looked at the options available in the WHENEVER statement, let s take a look at an example. Suppose that you want your SQL statements to go to a certain part of the
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program if an error occurs. In the following WHENEVER statement, an exception will cause the program to move to the Error1 section:
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EXEC SQL WHENEVER SQLEXCEPTION GOTO Error1;
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Notice that the SQLEXCEPTION option and the GOTO option are specified in this statement. The SQLEXCEPTION option tells the program to take a specified action if an SQL statement generates an exception. The GOTO option defines the action that should be taken. In this case, the option specifies that the program should move to the Error1 section of the host language. A WHENEVER statement applies to the embedded SQL statements that follow it. You can embed as many WHENEVER statements in your host language as necessary. The last statement to appear is the one that is applied to the other statements.
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In most of the Try This exercises in this book, you used a client application to access your SQL database interactively. However, because of the subject matter of this chapter, particularly with regard to embedded SQL, this exercise will take a different approach from previous Try This exercises. For this exercise, you will use some type of text editing program (such as Microsoft Notepad) to complete the steps. Because programming in a host language is beyond the scope of this book, you will create only the SQL statements that are embedded in the host language. The statements will conform to C, although they might apply to other host languages. In the exercise, you will set up variable declarations, create an error-handling statement, and embed an SQL SELECT statement that queries data from the INVENTORY database. You can download the Try_This_17_1.txt file, which contains the embedded SQL statements used in this Try This exercise.
Step by Step
1. Open a text editing program such as Microsoft Notepad. 2. The first step is to create one input host variable and two output host variables. The
purpose of the input host variable is to be able to receive a CD identifier from the user. That identifier can then be used in the WHERE clause of the SELECT statement to determine which row of data will be returned from the COMPACT_DISCS table. Along with declaring the variables, you will include comments that identify the purpose of those variables. Type the following embedded SQL statements and variable declarations into your text document:
EXEC SQL BEGIN DECLARE SECTION; long v_CD_ID; /* input variable for CD identifier */ varchar v_CD_TITLE[60]; /* output variable for CD title */ long v_IN_STOCK; /* output variable for IN_STOCK value */ EXEC SQL END DECLARE SECTION;
17:
Accessing SQL Data from Your Host Program
Notice that the variable declaration section is required, so you had to include the BEGIN DECLARE SECTION statement and the END DECLARE SECTION statement. These statements are necessary to notify the precompiler that the variable declarations will be used in the embedded SQL statements.
3. After you create your declaration section, you realize that you want to include indicator
variables for the output data variables. As a result, you must add two declarations to your declaration section. Type the following declarations into your text document:
short ind_CD_TITLE; /* indicator variable for v_CD_TITLE */ short ind_IN_STOCK; /* indicator variable for v_IN_STOCK */
You can add the declarations anywhere in your declaration section. However, for clear coding, I suggest you add them close to each of their associated data variables, as shown in the following declaration section:
EXEC SQL BEGIN DECLARE SECTION; long v_CD_ID; /* input variable for CD identifier */ varchar v_CD_TITLE[60]; /* output variable for CD title */ short ind_CD_TITLE; /* indicator variable for v_CD_TITLE */ long v_IN_STOCK; /* output variable for IN_STOCK value */ short ind_IN_STOCK; /* indicator variable for v_IN_STOCK */ EXEC SQL END DECLARE SECTION;
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