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Now let s look at an example of the DROP SCHEMA statement. The following code removes the INVENTORY schema:
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DROP SCHEMA INVENTORY CASCADE;
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Notice that the CASCADE option is used, which means that all schema objects and SQL data will be removed.
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Despite the fact that the SQL standard does not define what a database is, let alone provide a statement to create any sort of database object, there is a good possibility that you ll be working with an RDBMS that not only supports the creation of a database object, but also uses that object as the foundation for its hierarchical structure in the management of data objects. Consequently, you might find that, in order to work through the examples and projects in this book, you will want to create a test database so you have an environment in which you can create, alter, or delete data objects or data as necessary, without risking the loss of data definitions or data from an actual database. (Ideally, you ll be working with an RDBMS that is a clean installation, without any existing databases, except preinstalled system and sample databases.) If you ve already worked with an RDBMS, you might be familiar with how database objects are organized within that system. For example, if you take a look again at Figure 2-3, you can see that SQL Server organizes the server s databases into a logical structure beneath the Databases node. Each database node (for example, INVENTORY) contains child nodes that represent the different types of objects associated with that particular database. As you can see, the INVENTORY database currently lists eight categories of objects: Database Diagrams, Tables, Views, Synonyms, Programmability, Service Broker, Storage, and Security. And under the ARTIST_CDS table, the categories are Columns, Keys, Constraints, Triggers, Indexes, and Statistics. For a definition of how SQL Server defines each of these types of objects, you should view the product documentation, which you should do for any RDBMS. Compare and contrast that with Oracle s categories of objects as shown in Figure 2-4. Most products that support database objects also support language to create those objects. For example, Oracle, MySQL, and SQL Server all include the CREATE DATABASE statement in their SQL-based languages. However, which parameters can be defined when building that statement, what permissions you need in order to execute that statement, and how a system implements the database object vary from product to product. Fortunately, most products use the same basic syntax to create a database object: CREATE DATABASE <database name> <additional parameters> Before creating a database in any system, make sure to first read the product documentation, and if appropriate, consult with a database administrator to be sure that it is safe for you to add a database object to the SQL environment. Once you create the database, you can create schemas, tables, views, and other objects within that database, and from there, populate the tables with the necessary data.
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In Try This 1-2: Connecting to a Database, you established access to an RDBMS. In that project, you used a front-end application that allowed you to directly invoke SQL statements. You will be using that application for this project (and the rest of the projects in the book) to create a database and a schema, or whichever of these functions your system supports. Once you create the database, you should work within the context of that database for future examples and projects. If your system supports schema creation but not database creation, you should work within the context of that schema for the other projects.
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