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SQL client that runs as a command-line application on a variety of operating systems, including Microsoft Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, and various Unix implementations. Web-based SQL client supported in versions from Oracle 9i and up. SQL client that runs either as a Microsoft Windows application or as a commandline application on a variety of operating systems, including Microsoft Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, various Unix implementations, and others. SQL client written in Java available in Oracle 8i and 9i but replaced by iSQL*Plus in Oracle 10g. SQL client that runs as a command-line application in a Microsoft Windows command shell. The similarity to Microsoft SQL Server is no accident the earliest versions of Microsoft SQL Server were based on the Sybase DBMS.
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A Brief History of SQL
In the later 1970s, a group of IBM researchers developed an experimental relational database called System/R, based on Dr. E. F. Codd s work. A language called SEQUEL (Structured English Query Language) was included in System/R to manipulate and retrieve data. The acronym SEQUEL was later condensed to the abbreviation SQL when it was discovered that the word SEQUEL was a trademark held by the Hawker-Siddeley Aircraft Company of the U.K. Although IBM had the rst implementation of SQL, two other products, with various names for their query languages, beat IBM to the marketplace with the rst commercial relational database products: Relational Software s Oracle and Relational Technology s INGRES. IBM released SQL/DS in 1982, with the query language now named SQL (Structured Query Language). Although structured programming was the mantra of the day in the 1980s, the structured in the name SQL has nothing to do with structured programming since SQL isn t a procedural programming language. However, it is entirely possible that the marketing spin on
CHAPTER 2 SQL Concepts
Figure 2-4
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structured programming helped bolster the name SQL over the names coined by other vendors of the day for their data query languages. SQL standards committees were formed by ANSI (American National Standards Institute) in 1986 and ISO (International Organization for Standardization) in 1987. Fortunately, the committees from the two organizations worked together to develop a common, worldwide SQL standard. Two years later, the rst standard speci cation, known as SQL-89, was published. The standard was expanded three years later into SQL-92, which weighed in at roughly 600 pages. The third generation was called SQL-99, or SQL3. Most RDBMS products are built to the SQL-92 (now called SQL2) standard. SQL3 includes many of the object features required for SQL to operate on an object-relational database, as well as language extensions to make SQL computationally complete (adding looping, branching, and case constructs). The most recent generation, known as SQL:2003, introduces XML-related features and other enhancements. Only a few vendors have implemented signi cant components of the SQL3 and SQL:2003 standards. While DBMS vendors have teams of people devoted to standards compliance, most people who write SQL are
SQL Demysti ed
not well versed in them. This is largely because the standards are not freely available. The SQL:2003 standard may be purchased from ISO (www.iso.org) or ANSI (webstore.ansi.org). For those on a budget, a late draft is available from Whitemarsh Information Systems Corporation (www.wiscorp.com/SQLStandards.html). Standards are important because they promote portability, which is the ease with which software can be made to run ( ported ) to other platforms. In the case of SQL, portability across RDBMS products from different vendors was poor until the vendors started complying with published standards. Nevertheless, nearly every vendor has added extensions to their dialect of SQL, partly because they wanted to differentiate their products and partly because market demands pressed them into implementing features before there were standards for them. One case in point is support for the DATE and TIMESTAMP data types. Dates are highly important in business data processing, but the developers of the original RDBMS products were computer scientists and academics, not business computing specialists, so such a need was unanticipated. As a result, the early SQL dialects did not have any special support for dates. As commercial products emerged, vendors responded to pressure from their biggest customers by hurriedly adding support for dates. Unfortunately, this led to each doing so in their own way. Whenever you migrate SQL statements from one vendor to another, beware of the SQL dialect differences. SQL is highly compatible and portable across vendor products, but complete database systems can seldom be moved without some adjustments.
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