barcode generator vb.net SQL Server Books Online in Software

Maker QR-Code in Software SQL Server Books Online

SQL Server Books Online
Scanning Denso QR Bar Code In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Quick Response Code Generator In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create QR Code image in Software applications.
4:
Scanning Quick Response Code In None
Using Barcode decoder for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
QR Printer In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode generator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Quick Response Code image in VS .NET applications.
SQL Server 7 Architecture
Make Quick Response Code In .NET Framework
Using Barcode maker for ASP.NET Control to generate, create QR Code 2d barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
QR Code Drawer In .NET Framework
Using Barcode printer for .NET framework Control to generate, create Quick Response Code image in .NET applications.
about why database servers are so complex, and provide a sound introduction to important data management issues. For old-timers, it may serve as a reminder of why we deal with such things as security and managing user access. And even if you ve been around the database block (no pun intended), you ll probably still find it useful to review some basic issues that you may take for granted. We ll start with some of the basics and spend more time on topics that are related to data protection. Specifically, you ll find details on how to implement and manage the features related to SQL Server s security architecture and how to measure and monitor performance. We ll also briefly cover other topics, such as the overall network and database architecture and information from a developer s point of view. Let s begin by looking at what makes up a relational database server.
Drawing QR Code 2d Barcode In VB.NET
Using Barcode creation for VS .NET Control to generate, create QR image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
GTIN - 12 Encoder In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in Software applications.
Before moving into the specifics of SQL Server, it s probably worth taking some time to examine the fundamental concepts on which databases are designed. At its most basic level, a database is simply a repository for information. This data storage space is responsible for maintaining data in an organized fashion and then making this data available to users and applications that need it. Managing issues such as security, concurrency, and transactions are the responsibility of the database server engine. We ll get to these topics later in this chapter. First, though, we should examine the objects and relationships that make up a database.
Drawing ANSI/AIM Code 128 In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create Code 128C image in Software applications.
Code 3/9 Maker In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create Code 39 image in Software applications.
NOTE: There are many different database platforms in the market today, and each uses slightly different terminology. For example a database instance in the Oracle world is quite different from a database on SQL Server. Although the underlying concepts are the same, keep in mind that differences exist. I ll make notes where relevant, but the terminology I m using pertains mainly to the SQL Server world.
Bar Code Creator In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
EAN13 Creator In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create European Article Number 13 image in Software applications.
Database Objects
Leitcode Encoder In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create Leitcode image in Software applications.
Create Code 39 Full ASCII In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET framework Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Before diving too far into the technical guts of a relational database management system (RDBMS), let s look at the common types of database objects they support. These are the structures related to data with which users interact. The purpose of a database server is to manage these objects and the information they store and represent. Database objects supported in SQL Server 7 are described next.
Printing DataMatrix In .NET
Using Barcode printer for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Reporting Service applications.
Barcode Recognizer In Java
Using Barcode Control SDK for Java Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Java applications.
RELATIONAL DATABASES
Scanning GS1 - 12 In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode reader for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
EAN-13 Printer In None
Using Barcode encoder for Microsoft Excel Control to generate, create EAN-13 image in Microsoft Excel applications.
AM FL Y
Bar Code Creation In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generator for Reporting Service Control to generate, create barcode image in Reporting Service applications.
Generating Code 128C In .NET
Using Barcode encoder for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 128C image in ASP.NET applications.
Team-Fly
NOTE: Throughout this chapter, I will be referring to the various operating systems on which SQL Server 7 can be run. These include Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows NT 4.0, and Windows 2000. In almost all cases, SQL Server 7 functions the same way in Windows 2000 as in Windows NT so when I refer to Windows NT, keep in mind that the information presented also applies to Windows 2000. (Wherever differences do exist, I will state them explicitly.)
SQL Server 7 Backup & Recovery
Tables
The fundamental unit of data storage in a relational database is the table. Tables store information in rows. Each row, in turn, contains values for one or more columns that specify related information about a single data item. Tables are the structures in which actual information resides. In SQL Server, tables are built within a database (which, in turn, resides on a data file). We ll look at the actual storage concepts related to table data later in this chapter. For now, know that the majority of user-related database functions will involve the use of information stored in tables in one way or another. These are also the fundamental objects that you will be responsible for protecting in your backup and recovery plans.
Views
A view is a database object that actually refers to data stored in one or more tables. Views are database objects that are defined by SQL queries (which we ll cover later). They specify which information is to be returned to a user. Users interact with views in the same way that they interact with tables. However, views do not actually store data; instead, they retrieve relational information from tables, as illustrated in Figure 4-2. Views are used in several types of scenarios and can be very helpful in managing information. One benefit is in regard to security. You can create a view of a table that allows users to see only a subset of the information stored in one or more tables. This is useful, for example, if you have an employee records table that contains sensitive information. You might create a view that allows users to query against all information except salary information. Furthermore, you might choose to restrict permissions on the underlying database itself and assign permissions to the view only. Views can even refer to other views, although this practice can sometimes make it difficult to debug any problems that crop up. Overall, though, views enable you to simplify administration and improve security.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.