Stored Procedure Design Concepts in .NET framework

Encode Data Matrix 2d barcode in .NET framework Stored Procedure Design Concepts

CHAPTER
Data Matrix Decoder In VS .NET
Using Barcode Control SDK for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in VS .NET applications.
ECC200 Encoder In .NET Framework
Using Barcode creation for VS .NET Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in VS .NET applications.
Stored Procedure Design Concepts
Read ECC200 In .NET
Using Barcode scanner for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
Draw Bar Code In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode encoder for VS .NET Control to generate, create barcode image in .NET framework applications.
IN THIS CHAPTER:
Scan Bar Code In VS .NET
Using Barcode recognizer for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
Painting Data Matrix 2d Barcode In Visual C#
Using Barcode creator for .NET framework Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Anatomy of a Stored Procedure Types of Stored Procedures Compilation Managing Stored Procedures The Role of Stored Procedures in the Development of Database Applications
DataMatrix Creator In VS .NET
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in ASP.NET applications.
Data Matrix 2d Barcode Creation In VB.NET
Using Barcode creator for VS .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in VS .NET applications.
SQL Server 2000 Stored Procedure & XML Programming
Generating Code 3/9 In .NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET Control to generate, create Code-39 image in VS .NET applications.
Encoding Matrix Barcode In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode creator for .NET framework Control to generate, create Matrix Barcode image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
stored procedure is a set of T-SQL statements that is compiled and stored as a single database object for later repetitive use. They are the equivalent of subroutines and functions in other programming languages. Upon completion of this chapter, you will be able to do the following: Create a stored procedure Explain the elements of a stored procedure List ways to return information from a stored procedure Pass input parameters to a stored procedure Receive output parameters from a stored procedure Receive a return value from a stored procedure Explain where stored procedures are stored on SQL Server Explain the compilation and reuse of stored procedures
UPC-A Supplement 5 Encoder In VS .NET
Using Barcode creation for .NET framework Control to generate, create Universal Product Code version A image in .NET applications.
EAN-8 Supplement 5 Add-On Maker In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode maker for .NET framework Control to generate, create EAN-8 Supplement 2 Add-On image in .NET applications.
Anatomy of a Stored Procedure
Drawing European Article Number 13 In None
Using Barcode drawer for Microsoft Word Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Word applications.
Barcode Drawer In None
Using Barcode printer for Office Word Control to generate, create barcode image in Microsoft Word applications.
We can describe a stored procedure in terms of Composition Functionality Syntax
UPC A Creator In Java
Using Barcode creator for Eclipse BIRT Control to generate, create UPCA image in Eclipse BIRT applications.
Barcode Generation In .NET Framework
Using Barcode creator for Reporting Service Control to generate, create barcode image in Reporting Service applications.
Composition
Matrix Barcode Encoder In VB.NET
Using Barcode generation for VS .NET Control to generate, create 2D Barcode image in VS .NET applications.
Decode ECC200 In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode recognizer for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Logically, a stored procedure consists of A header that defines the name of the stored procedure, the input and output parameters, and some miscellaneous processing options. You can think of it as an API (application programming interface) or declaration of the stored procedure. A body that contains one or more Transact-SQL statements to be executed at runtime.
Generating UPC A In VB.NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in VS .NET applications.
Encoding GS1 DataBar-14 In Java
Using Barcode generator for Java Control to generate, create GS1 RSS image in Java applications.
Creating Stored Procedures
Let s look at the simplified syntax for implementing the core functionality of stored procedures:
3: Stored Procedure Design Concepts
CREATE PROC[EDURE] procedure_name [ {@parameter data_type} [= default] [OUTPUT] ] [,...n] AS sql_statement [...n]
The following is an example of a stored procedure:
Create Procedure prGetEquipment @chvMake varchar(50) as Select * from Equipment where Make = @chvMake
This Transact-SQL statement creates a stored procedure named prGetEquipment with one input parameter. During execution, prGetEquipment returns a result set containing all records from the Equipment table having a Make column equal to the input parameter. Please, be patient and do not create the procedure in the Asset database yet. If you try to create a stored procedure that already exists in the database, SQL Server will report an error. You can reproduce such an error if you run the same statement for creating a stored procedure twice. For example:
Server: Msg 2729, Level 16, State 5, Procedure prGetEquipment, Line 3 Procedure 'prGetEquipment' group number 1 already exists in the database. Choose another procedure name.
As I have shown in 2, one way to change a stored procedure is to drop and re-create it. There are two ways to prevent the error just described. One way is to use an Alter Procedure statement to change the stored procedure. I will explain this technique in the next section. The traditional way to prevent this error is to delete a stored procedure (using the Drop Procedure statement) and then create it again:
Drop Procedure prGetEquipment go Create Procedure prGetEquipment @intEqTypeId int as Select * from Equipment where EqTypeId = @intEqTypeId go
SQL Server 2000 Stored Procedure & XML Programming
If you are not sure whether a stored procedure exists, you can write a piece of code to check for its existence. If you do not, SQL Server will report an error when you try to drop a stored procedure that does not exist. This code takes advantage of the fact that SQL Server records each database object in the sysobjects table (see Storing Stored Procedures, later in this chapter). It also uses programming constructs I have not yet introduced in this book. For now, do not worry about the details. All will become clear later.
if exists (select * from sysobjects where id = object_id('prGetEquipment ') and OBJECTPROPERTY(id, 'IsProcedure') = 1) drop procedure prGetEquipment GO Create Procedure prGetEquipment @intEqTypeId int as Select * from Equipment where EqTypeId = @intEqTypeId go
NOTE
Most of the stored procedures in this book already exist in the database. If you just try to create them, SQL Server will complain. If you are sure that the code that you have typed is correct, you can drop the original stored procedure and put yours in its place. Or you can alter the original stored procedure and use your code instead. It is much better to rename your stored procedure. All stored procedures in the Asset database start with the pr prefix. You could start yours, for example, with up (for user procedure). I follow a similar practice when I create several versions of the same stored procedure to illustrate a point or a technique. I merely change the stored procedure s suffix by adding a version number (for instance, _1, _2, and so on).
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.