barcode generator vb.net download PART IV in Software

Drawer QR Code 2d barcode in Software PART IV

PART IV
Recognize QR In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Denso QR Bar Code Printer In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create QR image in Software applications.
Part IV:
Decoding Denso QR Bar Code In None
Using Barcode scanner for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
QR Code 2d Barcode Creator In C#
Using Barcode drawer for .NET Control to generate, create QR image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Database Structure
Drawing QR In VS .NET
Using Barcode creator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create QR Code ISO/IEC18004 image in ASP.NET applications.
QR Creation In .NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET Control to generate, create QR-Code image in .NET applications.
CREATE SCHEMA
Creating QR Code ISO/IEC18004 In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET framework Control to generate, create QR Code image in .NET applications.
Data Matrix 2d Barcode Maker In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create ECC200 image in Software applications.
schema-name AUTHORIZATION user-name AUTHORIZATION user-name
Making Code 39 Extended In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in Software applications.
Universal Product Code Version A Maker In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 5 image in Software applications.
DEFAULT CHARACTER SET charset-name
Paint Barcode In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create bar code image in Software applications.
Encode Bar Code In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
CREATE TABLE CREATE VIEW CREATE DOMAIN CREATE ASSERTION CREATE COLLATION CREATE TRANSLATION GRANT privilages
Encode Code 2 Of 7 In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Codabar image in Software applications.
Making DataBar In VS .NET
Using Barcode creator for .NET Control to generate, create GS1 DataBar-14 image in VS .NET applications.
remainder of table definition remainder of view definition remainder of domain definition remainder of assertion definition remainder of collation definition remainder of translation definition remainder of privilege definition
EAN / UCC - 14 Creator In Java
Using Barcode creator for Java Control to generate, create EAN 128 image in Java applications.
Bar Code Encoder In Java
Using Barcode printer for Java Control to generate, create barcode image in Java applications.
CREATE CHARACTER SET remainder of character set definition
Code 39 Extended Creator In Java
Using Barcode generator for Java Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in Java applications.
Barcode Decoder In Java
Using Barcode Control SDK for Java Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Java applications.
FIGURE 13-14
Printing GS1 DataBar In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create DataBar image in Java applications.
Universal Product Code Version A Printer In None
Using Barcode drawer for Microsoft Word Control to generate, create GTIN - 12 image in Word applications.
CREATE SCHEMA statement syntax diagram
The schema defines the two tables and gives certain other users permission to access them. It doesn t define any additional structures, such as views or assertions. Note that the CREATE TABLE statements within the CREATE SCHEMA statement are legitimate SQL statements in their own right. If you type them into an interactive SQL program, the DBMS will create the specified tables in the current default schema for your interactive SQL session, according to the standard. Note that the schema structure is related to, but independent of, the user-id structure. A given user can be the owner of several different named schemas. For backward compatibility with the SQL1 standard, however, the current SQL standard allows you to create a schema with: Both a schema name and a user-id (as in the last example). Only a schema name. In this case, the user who executes the CREATE SCHEMA statement automatically becomes the owner of the schema. Only a user-id. In this case, the schema name becomes the user-id. This conforms to the SQL1 standard, and to the practice of many commercial DBMS products where there was conceptually one schema per user. A schema that is no longer needed can be dropped using the DROP SCHEMA statement, shown in Figure 13-15. The statement requires that you specify one of the drop rules previously described for dropping columns either CASCADE or RESTRICT. If you specify CASCADE, then all of the structures within the schema definition (tables, views, assertions,
13:
Creating a Database
DROP SCHEMA schema-name
RESTRICT CASCADE
FIGURE 13-15
DROP SCHEMA statement syntax diagram
and so on) are automatically dropped. If you specify RESTRICT, the statement will not succeed if any of these structures remains within the schema. Effectively, the RESTRICT rule forces you to first drop the individual tables, views, and other structures within the schema before dropping the schema itself. This is a protection against accidentally dropping a schema that contains data or database definitions of value. No ALTER SCHEMA table is specified by the SQL standard. Instead, you can individually alter the definitions of the structures within a schema, using statements like ALTER TABLE. At any time while a user or program is accessing a database, one of its schemas is identified as the default schema. Any DDL statements that you execute to create, drop, or alter schema structures implicitly apply to this schema. In addition, all tables named in SQL data manipulation statements are assumed to be tables defined within this default schema. The schema name implicitly qualifies the names of all tables used in the SQL statements. As noted in 5, you can use a qualified table name to refer to tables from other schemas. According to the SQL standard, the name used to qualify the table name is the schema name. For example, if the sample database were created as part of a schema named SALES, the qualified table name for the OFFICES table would be
SALES.OFFICES
If a schema is created with just a user-id as the schema name, then the table qualification scheme becomes exactly the simple one described in 5. The schema name is the user name, and the qualified table name specifies this name before the dot. The CREATE SCHEMA statement has one other nonobvious advantage. You may recall from the earlier discussion of the CREATE TABLE statement that you could not easily create a referential cycle (two or more tables that refer to one another using foreign key/primary key relationships). Instead, one of the tables had to be created first without its foreign key definition, and then the foreign key definition had to be added (with the ALTER TABLE statement) after the other table(s) had been created. The CREATE SCHEMA statement avoids this problem, since the DBMS does not check the referential integrity constraints specified by the schema until all of the tables it defines have been created. In practice, the CREATE SCHEMA statement is generally used to create a new set of interrelated tables for the first time. Subsequently, individual tables are added, modified, or dropped using the CREATE/ ALTER/DROP TABLE capabilities. Many of the major DBMS brands have moved to adopt some form of the CREATE SCHEMA statement, although there are significant variations across the brands. Oracle s CREATE SCHEMA statement allows you to create tables, views, and privileges, but not the other SQL structures, and it requires that the schema name and the user name be one and the same. Informix Universal Server follows a similar pattern, requiring a user-id as the schema name and extending the objects within the schema to include indexes, triggers, and synonyms. Sybase provides similar capabilities. In each case, the offered capabilities conform to the SQL entry-level implementation requirements.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.