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Informix allows the use of row types to go one step beyond their role as data type templates for individual columns. You can use a row type to define the structure of an entire table. For example, with this row type definition:
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CREATE ROW EMPL_NUM NAME ADDRESS TYPE PERS_TYPE ( INTEGER, NAME_TYPE, ADDR_TYPE);
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you can define the PERSONNEL table using the row type as a model:
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CREATE TABLE PERSONNEL OF TYPE PERS_TYPE;
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The columns of this PERSONNEL table will be exactly as they were in the previous CREATE TABLE examples, but now PERSONNEL is a typed table. The most basic use of the typed table capability is to formalize the object structure in the database. Each object class has its own row type, and the typed table that holds objects (rows) of that class is defined in terms of the row type. Beyond this usage, typed tables are also a key component of the Informix notion of table inheritance, described later in the Inheritance section.
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Unfortunately, structured data types create new complexity for database update statements that must insert or modify their structured data values. Informix Universal Server is fairly liberal in its data type conversion requirements for unnamed row types. The data you assign into a row-type column must simply have the same number of fields of the same data types. The ROW constructor is used, as shown in previous examples, to assemble individual data items into a row-type value for inserting or updating data. For named row types, the requirement is more stringent; the data you assign into a named row-type column must actually have the same named row type. You can achieve this in the INSERT statement by explicitly casting the constructed row value to have the NAME_TYPE data type:
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INSERT INTO PERSONNEL VALUES (1234, ROW('John', 'J', 'Jones')::NAME_TYPE, ROW('197 Rose St.', 'Chicago', 'IL', ROW(12345, 6789)));
The double-colon operator casts the constructed three-field row as a NAME_TYPE row and makes the VALUES clause compatible with the data types of the columns in the table. Oracle uses a slightly different approach to constructing structured data items and inserting them into columns that have abstract data types. When you create an Oracle abstract data type (using the CREATE TYPE statement), Oracle automatically defines a constructor method for the type. You can think of the constructor method as a function that takes as its arguments the individual components of the abstract data type and that returns an abstract data type value, with the individual components all packaged together. The constructor is used in the VALUES clause of the INSERT statement to glue the individual
24:
SQL and Objects
data item values together into a structured data value that matches the column definition. Here is an INSERT statement for the PERSONNEL table:
INSERT INTO PERSONNEL VALUES (1234, NAME_TYPE('John', 'J', 'Jones'), ADDR_TYPE('197 Rose St.', 'Chicago', 'IL', POST_TYPE(12345, 6789)));
The constructors (NAME_TYPE, ADDR_TYPE, POST_TYPE) perform the same functions as the ROW constructor does for Informix, and also provide the casting required to ensure strict data type correspondence.
Inheritance
Support for abstract data types gives the relational data model a foundation for object-based capabilities. The abstract data type can embody the representation of an object, and the values of its individual fields or subcolumns are its attributes. Another important feature of the object-oriented model is inheritance. With inheritance, new objects can be defined as being a particular type of an existing object type (class) and inherit the predefined attributes and behaviors of that type. Figure 24-2 shows an example of how inheritance might work in a model of a company s employee data. All employees are members of the class PERSONNEL, and they all have the attributes associated with being an employee (employee number, name, and address). Some employees are salespeople, and they have additional attributes (such as a sales quota and the identity of their sales manager). Other employees are engineers, with a different set of attributes (such as the academic degrees they hold or the current project to which they are assigned). Each of these employee types has its own class, which is a subclass of PERSONNEL. The subclass inherits all of the characteristics of the class above it in the hierarchy. (We want to track all of the core personnel data for engineers and salespeople, too.) However, the subclasses have additional information that is unique to their type of object. In Figure 24-2, the class hierarchy goes down to a third layer for engineers, differentiating between technicians and managers.
Personnel (PERS_TYPE) Sales people (SALES_TYPE) Technicians (TECH_TYPE) Engineers (ENGR_TYPE) Managers (MGR_TYPE)
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