free barcode generator using vb.net DATABASE STRUCTURE in Software

Generation Code 128A in Software DATABASE STRUCTURE

DATABASE STRUCTURE
Code 128 Code Set A Decoder In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Print Code 128 In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create Code128 image in Software applications.
WORKSIN (REP_OFFICE) OFFICES SET NULL QUOTA_CAP CHECK ((HIRE_DATE < "01-JAN-88") OR (QUOTA <= 300000)))
Code 128 Decoder In None
Using Barcode reader for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Create Code 128C In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode generation for VS .NET Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 128 image in .NET framework applications.
This check constraint capability is supported by many of the major DBMS brands.
Generate Code 128 Code Set A In .NET
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 128A image in ASP.NET applications.
Encoding Code 128 Code Set C In .NET Framework
Using Barcode drawer for VS .NET Control to generate, create Code 128C image in .NET applications.
SQL: The Complete Reference
Draw Code 128C In VB.NET
Using Barcode generator for VS .NET Control to generate, create Code 128A image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Make Code 3/9 In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in Software applications.
Physical Storage Definition *
Barcode Generator In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
Making UPC A In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 5 image in Software applications.
The CREATE TABLE statement typically includes one or more optional clauses that specify physical storage characteristics for a table. Generally, these clauses are used only by the database administrator to optimize the performance of a production database. By their nature, these clauses are very specific to a particular DBMS. Although they are of little practical interest to most SQL users, the different physical storage structures provided by various DBMS products illustrate their different intended applications and levels of sophistication. Most of the personal computer databases provide very simple physical storage mechanisms. Many personal computer database products store an entire database within a single Windows file, or use a separate Windows file for each database table. They may also require that the entire table or database be stored on a single physical disk volume. Multiuser databases typically provide more sophisticated physical storage schemes to support improved database performance. For example, Ingres allows the database administrator to define multiple named locations, which are physical directories where database data can be stored. The locations can be spread across multiple disk volumes to take advantage of parallel disk input/output operations. You can optionally specify one or more locations for a table in the Ingres CREATE TABLE statement:
Create EAN13 In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create European Article Number 13 image in Software applications.
Paint EAN 128 In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in Software applications.
CREATE TABLE OFFICES (table-definition) WITH LOCATION = (AREA1, AREA2, AREA3)
Drawing Uniform Symbology Specification Code 93 In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create Code 93 Extended image in Software applications.
Barcode Encoder In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode creation for Reporting Service Control to generate, create bar code image in Reporting Service applications.
By specifying multiple locations, you can spread a table s contents across several disk volumes for greater parallel access to the table. Sybase offers a similar approach, allowing the database administrator to specify multiple named logical database devices that are used to store data. The correspondence between Sybase s logical devices and the actual physical disk drives of the computer system is handled by a Sybase utility program, and not within the SQL language. The Sybase CREATE DATABASE statement can then specify that a database should be stored on one or more database devices:
Barcode Encoder In None
Using Barcode drawer for Font Control to generate, create barcode image in Font applications.
Read Barcode In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode decoder for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
CREATE DATABASE OPDATA ON DBFILE1, DBFILE2, DBFILE3
Scanning Barcode In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode recognizer for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
UCC - 12 Drawer In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode creation for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Universal Product Code version A image in Reporting Service applications.
Within a given database device, Sybase then allows the database administrator to define logical segments, using one of the Sybase system-provided stored procedures. Finally, a Sybase CREATE TABLE statement can specify the segment where a table s data is to be stored:
Code 128 Code Set A Creator In None
Using Barcode drawer for Online Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 128 image in Online applications.
Encoding USS Code 128 In None
Using Barcode creation for Office Word Control to generate, create Code 128C image in Word applications.
CREATE TABLE OFFICES (table-definition) ON SEGMENT SEG1A
13:
Creating a Database
DB2 offers a similarly comprehensive scheme for managing physical storage, based on the concepts of tablespaces and nodegroups. A tablespace is a logical-level storage container, whereas nodegroups are defined more specifically in terms of physical storage. When you create a DB2 table, you can optionally assign it to a specific tablespace:
CREATE TABLE OFFICES (table-definition) IN ADMINDB.OPSPACE
Unlike Sybase, DB2 puts most of the management of these storage entities within the SQL language itself, through the CREATE TABLESPACE and CREATE NODEGROUP statements. A consequence is that these statements include operating system dependent specifications of filenames and directories, which vary from one supported DB2 operating system to another. Other clauses specify the DB2 buffer pool to be used, the overhead and transfer rate of the storage medium, and other characteristics closely related to the physical storage medium. DB2 uses this information in its performance optimization algorithms.
Removing a Table (DROP TABLE)
Over time, the structure of a database grows and changes. New tables are created to represent new entities, and some old tables are no longer needed. You can remove an unneeded table from the database with the DROP TABLE statement, shown in Figure 13-3. The table name in the statement identifies the table to be dropped. Normally, you will be dropping one of your own tables and will use an unqualified table name. With proper permission, you can also drop a table owned by another user by specifying a qualified table name. Here are some examples of the DROP TABLE statement:
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.