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O/S directory for large object storage User-defined function External functions callable from PL/SQL Group of sharable PL/SQL procedures User-defined Oracle stored procedure Limits on database resource usage User role within the database Storage area for database recovery Database schema User-defined value sequence Table of read-only query results Synonym (alias) for table or view Tablespace (storage area for Oracle data) Database trigger User-defined abstract data type Methods for an abstract data type Oracle user-id Database Default column value Local copy of existing remote table Sybase stored procedure User role within the database Column integrity rule Database schema Stored trigger
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DDL Statements in Popular SQL-Based Products (continued)
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Specified by the ANSI/ISO SQL standard CREATE/DROP ASSERTION CREATE/DROP CHARACTER SET CREATE/DROP COLLATION CREATE/DROP/ALTER DOMAIN CREATE/DROP SCHEMA CREATE/DROP TRANSLATION Table 13-1.
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Schemawide check constraint Extended character set Sorting sequence for character set Specification of valid data values Database schema Conversion between character sets
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Database Structure
The SQL1 standard specified a simple structure for the contents of a database, shown in Figure 13-8. Each user of the database has a collection of tables that are owned by that user. Virtually all major DBMS products support this scheme, although some (particularly those focused on special-purpose or embedded applications or personal computer usage) do not support the concept of table ownership. In these systems, all of the tables in a database are part of one large collection. Although different brands of SQL-based database management systems provide the same structure within a single database, there is wide variation in how they organize and
DATABASE STRUCTURE
Figure 13-8.
SQL1 organization of a database
SQL: The Complete Reference
structure the various databases on a particular computer system. Some brands assume a single systemwide database that stores all of the data on that system. Other DBMS brands support multiple databases on a single computer, with each database identified by name. Still other DBMS brands support multiple databases within the context of the computer s directory system. These variations don t change the way you use SQL to access the data within a database. However, they do affect the way you organize your data for example, do you mix order processing and accounting data in one database, or do you divide it into two databases They also affect the way you initially gain access to the database for example, if there are multiple databases, you need to tell the DBMS which one you want to use. To illustrate how various DBMS brands deal with these issues, suppose the sample database were expanded to support a payroll and an accounting application, in addition to the order-processing tasks it now supports.
Single-Database Architecture
Figure 13-9 shows a single-database architecture where the DBMS supports one systemwide database. Mainframe and minicomputer databases (such as the mainframe version of DB2 and Oracle) have historically tended to use this approach. Order processing, accounting, and payroll data are all stored in tables within the database. The major tables for each application are gathered together and owned by a single user, who is probably the person in charge of that application on this computer. An advantage of this architecture is that the tables in the various applications can easily reference one another. The TIMECARDS table of the payroll application, for example, can contain a foreign key that references the OFFICES table, and the applications can use that
Figure 13-9.
A single-database architecture
13:
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relationship to calculate commissions. With proper permission, users can run queries that combine data from the various applications. A disadvantage of this architecture is that the database will grow huge over time as more and more applications are added to it. A DB2 or Oracle database with several hundred tables is common. The problems of managing a database of that size performing backups, recovering data, analyzing performance, and so on usually require a full-time database administrator. In the single-database architecture, gaining access to the database is very simple there s only one database, so no choices need to be made. For example, the programmatic SQL statement that connects you to an Oracle database is CONNECT, and users tend to speak in terms of connecting to Oracle, rather than connecting to a specific database. (In fact, in this architecture, the database is usually associated with a single running copy of the DBMS software, so in a very real sense, the user is connecting to the DBMS.) Oracle and DB2 installations frequently do run two separate databases, one for production work and one for testing. Fundamentally, however, all production data is collected into a single database.
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