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SQL: The Complete Reference
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I The SQL/Call-Level Interface (SQL/CLI) standard is based on ODBC and is compatible with it at the core level. SQL/CLI provides a callable API to complement the embedded SQL interface specified in SQL2. Many DBMS vendors already support the SQL/CLI because of their historical support for ODBC. I For Java programs, the JDBC interface is the de facto industry standard callable API, supported by all of the major DBMS products and defined as the database management API within the Java2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) standard implemented by all of the major application server products. I The proprietary callable APIs of the different DBMS brands remain important in the market (especially Oracle s OCI). All of them offer the same basic features, but they vary dramatically in the extended features that they offer and in the details of the calls and data structures that they use. I In general, DBMS vendors put considerable performance-tuning work into their proprietary APIs and tend to offer ODBC and/or SQL/CLI support as a checkoff feature. Thus, applications with higher performance requirements tend to use the proprietary APIs, and are locked in to a particular DBMS brand when they do.
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Part VI
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The influence of SQL continues to expand as new SQL capabilities and extensions to SQL address new types of data management requirements. s 20 through 25 describe several of these newer areas. 20 describes stored procedures, which provide a processing capability within the DBMS itself for implementing business rules and creating well-defined database interactions. 21 describes SQL s role in analyzing data and the trend to create SQL-based data warehouses. 22 describes the role of SQL in creating interactive web sites, and especially its relationship to
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application server technology. 23 discusses how SQL is used to create distributed databases that tap the power of computer networks. 24 discusses one of the most important areas of SQL evolution the interplay between SQL and object-oriented technologies and the new generation of object-relational databases. 25 focuses on the relationship between SQL and one of the most important of these technologies, XML, and the emerging Internet web services architecture based on XML. Finally, 26 highlights the key trends that will drive the evolution of SQL for the coming decade.
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SQL: The Complete Reference
he long-term trend in the database market is for databases to take on a progressively larger role in the overall data processing architecture. The prerelational database systems basically handled only data storage and retrieval; applications programs were responsible for navigating their way through the database, sorting and selecting data, and handling all processing of the data. With the advent of relational databases and SQL, the DBMS took on expanded responsibilities. Database searching and sorting were embodied in SQL language clauses and provided by the DBMS, along with the capability to summarize data. Explicit navigation through the database became unnecessary. Subsequent SQL enhancements such as primary and foreign keys and check constraints continued the trend, taking over data checking and data integrity functions that had remained the responsibility of application programs with earlier SQL implementations. At each step, having the DBMS take on more responsibility provided more centralized control and reduced the possibility of data corruption due to application programming errors. In many information technology (IT) departments within large companies and organizations, this DBMS trend paralleled an organizational trend. The corporate database and the data it contains came to be viewed as a major corporate asset, and in many IT departments, a dedicated database administration (DBA) group emerged, with responsibility for maintaining the database, defining and updating the data it contained, and providing structured access to it. Other groups within the IT department, or elsewhere within the company, could develop application programs, reports, queries, or other logic that accessed the database. But the security of the database, the permitted forms of access, and in general, everything within the realm of the database, became the province of the DBA. Two important features of modern enterprise-scale relational databases stored procedures and triggers have been a part of this trend. Stored procedures provide the capability to perform database-related application processing within the database itself. For example, a stored procedure might implement the application s logic to accept a customer order or to transfer money from one bank account to another. Triggers are used to automatically invoke the processing capability of a stored procedure based on conditions that arise within the database. For example, a trigger might automatically transfer funds from a savings account to a checking account if the checking account becomes overdrawn. This chapter describes the core concepts behind stored procedures and triggers, and their implementation in several popular DBMS brands. The stored procedure and trigger capability of the popular DBMS products have been significantly expanded in their major revisions during the late 1990s and 2000s. A complete treatment of stored procedure and trigger programming is well beyond the scope of this book, but the concepts and comparisons here will give you an understanding of the core capabilities and a foundation for beginning to use the specific capabilities of your DBMS software. Stored procedures and triggers basically extend SQL into a more complete programming language, and this chapter assumes that you are familiar with basic programming concepts.
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