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The SQL2 standard also includes a list of potential keywords that are candidates for future revisions of the standard. These keywords are listed in Table 5-3. Throughout this book, the acceptable forms of a SQL statement are illustrated by a syntax diagram, such as the one shown in Figure 5-2. A valid SQL statement or clause is constructed by following the line through the syntax diagram to the dot that marks the end of the diagram. Keywords in the syntax diagram and in the examples (such as DELETE and FROM in Figure 5-2) are always shown in UPPERCASE, but almost all SQL implementations accept both uppercase and lowercase keywords, and it s often more convenient to actually type them in lowercase. Variable items in a SQL statement (such as the table name and search condition in Figure 5-2) are shown in lowercase italics. It s up to you to specify the appropriate item each time the statement is used. Optional clauses and keywords, such as the WHERE
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AFTER ALIAS ASYNC BEFORE BOOLEAN BREADTH COMPLETION CALL CYCLE DATA DEPTH DICTIONARY EACH ELSEIF Table 5-3.
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clause in Figure 5-2, are indicated by alternate paths through the syntax diagram. When a choice of optional keywords is offered, the default choice (that is, the behavior of the statement if no keyword is specified) is UNDERLINED.
Figure 5-2.
A sample syntax diagram
SQL: The Complete Reference
Names
The objects in a SQL-based database are identified by assigning them unique names. Names are used in SQL statements to identify the database object on which the statement should act. The most fundamental named objects in a relational database are table names (which identify tables), column names (which identify columns), and user names (which identify users of the database); conventions for naming these objects were specified in the original SQL1 standard. The ANSI/ISO SQL2 standard significantly expanded the list of named entities, to include schemas (collections of tables), constraints (restrictions on the contents of tables and their relationships), domains (sets of legal values that may be assigned to a column), and several other types of objects. Many SQL implementations support additional named objects, such as stored procedures, primary key/foreign key relationships, data entry forms, and data replication schemes. The original ANSI/ISO standard specified that SQL names must contain 1 to 18 characters, must begin with a letter, and may not contain any spaces or special punctuation characters. The SQL2 standard increased the maximum to 128 characters. In practice, the names supported by SQL-based DBMS products vary significantly. It s common to see tighter restrictions on names that are connected to other software outside of the database (such as user names, which may correspond to login names used by an operating system), and looser restrictions on names that are private to the database. The various products also differ in the special characters they permit in table names. For portability, it s best to keep names relatively short and to avoid the use of special characters.
Table Names
When you specify a table name in a SQL statement, SQL assumes that you are referring to one of your own tables (that is, a table that you created). Usually, you will want to choose table names that are short but descriptive. The table names in the sample database (ORDERS, CUSTOMERS, OFFICES, SALESREPS) are good examples. In a personal or departmental database, the choice of table names is usually up to the database developer or designer. In a larger, shared-use corporate database, there may be corporate standards for naming tables, to insure that table names do not conflict. In addition, most DBMS brands allow different users to create tables with the same name (that is, both Joe and Sam can create a table named BIRTHDAYS). The DBMS uses the appropriate table, depending on which user is requesting data. With the proper permission, you can also refer to tables owned by other users, by using a qualified table name. A qualified table name specifies both the name of the table s owner and the name of the table, separated by a period (.). For example, Joe could access the BIRTHDAYS table owned by Sam by using the qualified table name:
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