free barcode generator in vb.net Object Support in the SQL:1999 Standard in Software

Creator USS Code 128 in Software Object Support in the SQL:1999 Standard

Object Support in the SQL:1999 Standard
ANSI/AIM Code 128 Recognizer In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Code 128 Code Set C Drawer In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create Code-128 image in Software applications.
As mentioned at the beginning of this chapter, the largest area of SQL expansion in the SQL:1999 standard was object-relational support. The SQL:1999 standard specifies new statements, clauses, and expressions in the SQL language in these areas: I User-defined data types I Composite (abstract) data types I Array values I Overloaded (polymorphic) stored procedures I Row constructors and table constructors supporting abstract types I Row-valued and table-valued expressions supporting abstract types The SQL:1999 extensions don t exactly match any of the major commercial objectrelational DBMS products in their specifics, but the underlying concepts are the same as those illustrated in the earlier sections for specific products. It s likely that this area of SQL will follow the pattern of others with respect to the standard. Slowly, over a series of major releases, the major DBMS vendors will provide support for the SQL:1999 syntax where it can be added in parallel to their own, well-established proprietary syntax. This process has just begun for SQL:1999 object support. For the next several years, the object-relational capabilities that matter for real-world implementations will continue to be the vendor-proprietary capabilities.
Code128 Recognizer In None
Using Barcode recognizer for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Code-128 Drawer In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 128 image in VS .NET applications.
24:
Code128 Creator In VS .NET
Using Barcode maker for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set A image in ASP.NET applications.
Code-128 Drawer In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode maker for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Code 128 image in .NET applications.
SQL and Objects
Create Code 128B In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode generator for .NET Control to generate, create USS Code 128 image in .NET applications.
Bar Code Maker In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
Summary
EAN / UCC - 14 Encoder In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create USS-128 image in Software applications.
DataMatrix Drawer In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Software applications.
Object-oriented databases will likely play an increasing role in specialized market segments, such as engineering design, compound document processing, and graphical user interfaces. They are not being widely adopted for mainstream enterprise data processing applications. However, hybrid object-relational databases are being offered by some of the leading enterprise DBMS vendors: I The object-relational databases significantly extend the SQL and stored procedure languages with object-oriented statements, structures, and capabilities. I Common object-relational structures include abstract/structured data types, tables within tables, and explicit support for object identifiers. These capabilities stretch the simple relational model a great deal and tend to add complexity for casual or ad hoc users. I The object-relational extensions added by the various DBMS vendors are highly proprietary. There are significant conceptual differences in the approaches as well as differences in implementation approach. I Object-relational capabilities are particularly well suited for more complex data models, where the overall design of the database may be simpler, even though individual tables/objects are more complex. I Object-relational capabilities are a major focus of the SQL3 standards efforts, and more relational databases are likely to incorporate them in the future.
Painting Code39 In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create Code-39 image in Software applications.
Bar Code Printer In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
SQL TODAY AND TOMORROW
Make Planet In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create USPS Confirm Service Barcode image in Software applications.
Data Matrix Drawer In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generation for .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in .NET applications.
This page intentionally left blank.
Matrix Barcode Creation In .NET Framework
Using Barcode encoder for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Matrix Barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
Scanning Data Matrix In VS .NET
Using Barcode reader for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
25
Data Matrix Drawer In None
Using Barcode creation for Font Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in Font applications.
Encoding 1D In VS .NET
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create 1D Barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
SQL and XML
EAN-13 Reader In VB.NET
Using Barcode reader for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
DataMatrix Generator In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode generator for .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in VS .NET applications.
Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click Here for Terms of Use.
SQL: The Complete Reference
he eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is one of the most important new technologies to come out of the evolution of the Internet and the World Wide Web. XML is a standard language for representing and exchanging structured data. SQL is a standard language for defining, accessing, and updating the structured data stored in relational databases. It seems obvious on the surface that there should be a relationship between XML and SQL. The natural question is what is the relationship, and are the two technologies naturally in conflict or complementary to one another The answer is a little bit of both. This chapter provides an overview of XML basics, and then examines the evolving relationship of XML and SQL, and how XML is being integrated into major SQL products.
What Is XML
As implied by its name, XML is a markup language. It shares many characteristics with its more familiar cousin, the HyperText Markup Language (HTML), which has become wildly popular as the core technology enabling the World Wide Web and web browsers. The languages have common origins in document markup, a technique that is as old as the printing and publishing business. When a complex document, such as this book or a newsletter or a magazine, is to be printed, it can be thought of as having two related logical parts. The content of the document, which usually consists of text and graphics, contains its meaning. The structure of the document (titles, subtitles, paragraphs, captions) and the accompanying formatting (fonts, indentations, page layouts) help to organize the contents and ensure that they are presented in a meaningful way. Since the earliest days of printing and publishing, editors have employed markup symbols and formatting marks, embedded within the contents of the document itself, to indicate the document s structure and how it should be formatted for printing. When computerized publishing systems arrived on the scene, markup commands embedded within the contents of a document became instructions for the publishing software programs. Each type of publishing software or equipment had its own proprietary markup commands, making it difficult to move from one system to another. The Standard General Markup Language (SGML) was developed as a way to standardize markup languages, and eventually was adopted as an ISO standard. More precisely, SGML is a metalanguage for defining specific markup languages. Its inventors recognized that no single markup language could cover all of the possible markup requirements, but that all markup languages had common elements. By standardizing these common elements, a family of closely related markup languages could be created. HTML is one such markup language, focused especially on the use of hypertext to link documents together. XML is another such language, focused especially on strong typing and tight structuring of document contents. Their common roots in SGML make HTML and XML cousin languages, and account for their similarity. Both HTML and XML are World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) recommendations, defined by specifications that are developed by, voted on, and then published by the W3C. The W3C is an independent, nonprofit consortium whose purpose is to develop and advocate the use of standards associated with the Internet and the World Wide
25:
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.