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The AND Truth Table
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The OR Truth Table
RETRIEVING DATA
The SQL2 standard adds another logical search condition, the IS test, to the logic provided by AND, OR, and NOT. Figure 6-13 shows the syntax of the IS test, which checks to see whether the logical value of an expression or comparison test is TRUE, FALSE, or UNKNOWN (NULL). For example, the IS test:
((SALES - QUOTA) > 10000.00) IS UNKNOWN
can be used to find rows where the comparison cannot be done because either SALES or QUOTA has a NULL value. Similarly, the IS test:
((SALES - QUOTA) > 10000.00) IS FALSE
will select rows where SALES are not significantly above QUOTA. As this example shows, the IS test doesn t really add to the expressive power of SQL, since the test could just as easily have been written:
NOT ((SALES - QUOTA) > 10000.00)
For maximum portability, it s a good idea to avoid the tests and write the expressions using only AND, OR, and NOT. It s not always possible to avoid the IS UNKNOWN form of the test.
TRUE
FALSE
FALSE
TRUE
NULL
NULL
Table 6-3.
The Not Truth Table
SQL: The Complete Reference
Figure 6-13.
The IS test syntax diagram
Sorting Query Results (ORDER BY Clause)
Like the rows of a table in the database, the rows of query results are not arranged in any particular order. You can ask SQL to sort the results of a query by including the ORDER BY clause in the SELECT statement. The ORDER BY clause, shown in Figure 6-14, consists of the keywords ORDER BY, followed by a list of sort specifications separated by commas. For example, the results of this query are sorted on two columns, REGION and CITY: Show the sales for each office, sorted in alphabetical order by region, and within each region by city.
SELECT CITY, REGION, SALES FROM OFFICES ORDER BY REGION, CITY CITY -----------Atlanta Chicago New York Denver Los Angeles REGION SALES -------- -----------Eastern $367,911.00 Eastern $735,042.00 Eastern $692,637.00 Western $186,042.00 Western $835,915.00
Figure 6-14.
The ORDER BY clause syntax diagram
6:
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The first sort specification (REGION) is the major sort key; those that follow (CITY, in this case) are progressively more minor sort keys, used as tie breakers when two rows of query results have the same values for the more major keys. Using the ORDER BY clause, you can request sorting in an ascending or descending sequence, and you can sort on any item in the select list of the query. By default, SQL sorts data in ascending sequence. To request sorting in descending sequence, the keyword DESC is included in the sort specification, as in the next example: List the offices, sorted in descending order by sales, so that the offices with the largest sales appear first.
SELECT CITY, REGION, SALES FROM OFFICES ORDER BY SALES DESC CITY -----------Los Angeles Chicago New York Atlanta Denver REGION SALES -------- -----------Western $835,915.00 Eastern $735,042.00 Eastern $692,637.00 Eastern $367,911.00 Western $186,042.00
RETRIEVING DATA
As indicated in Figure 6-14, you can also use the keyword ASC to specify an ascending sort, but because that s the default sorting sequence, the keyword is usually omitted. If the column of query results to be used for sorting is a calculated column, it has no column name to be used in a sort specification. In this case, you must specify a column number instead of a column name, as in this example: List the offices, sorted in descending order by sales performance, so that the offices with the best performance appear first.
SELECT CITY, REGION, (SALES - TARGET) FROM OFFICES ORDER BY 3 DESC CITY -----------New York Los Angeles Atlanta Chicago Denver REGION (SALES-TARGET) -------- --------------Eastern $117,637.00 Western $110,915.00 Eastern $17,911.00 Eastern $64,958.00 Western $113,958.00
SQL: The Complete Reference
These query results are sorted on the third column, which is the calculated difference between the SALES and TARGET for each office. By combining column numbers, column names, ascending sorts, and descending sorts, you can specify quite complex sorting of the query results, as in the following final example: List the offices, sorted in alphabetical order by region, and within each region in descending order by sales performance.
SELECT CITY, REGION, (SALES - TARGET) FROM OFFICES ORDER BY REGION ASC, 3 DESC CITY -----------New York Atlanta Chicago Los Angeles Denver REGION (SALES-TARGET) -------- --------------Eastern $117,637.00 Eastern $17,911.00 Eastern $64,958.00 Western $110,915.00 Western $113,958.00
The SQL2 standard allows you to control the sorting order used by the DBMS for each sort key. This can be important when working with international character sets or to insure portability between ASCII and EBCDIC character set systems. However, this area of the SQL2 specification is quite complex, and in practice, many SQL implementations either ignore sorting sequence issues or use their own proprietary scheme for user control of the sorting sequence.
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