codeproject vb.net barcode generator LUBRICATION 20.16 in Software

Printer UPC - 13 in Software LUBRICATION 20.16

LUBRICATION 20.16
EAN13 Scanner In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Creating GS1 - 13 In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Software applications.
BEARINGS AND LUBRICATION
Decoding EAN13 In None
Using Barcode recognizer for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Painting UPC - 13 In Visual C#
Using Barcode generator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in VS .NET applications.
oils for gas-turbine lubrication, and by about 1960 they were almost universally used for aircraft jet engines. For the even more demanding conditions of supersonic jet engines, the more complex ester lubricants such as hindered phenols and triesters were developed. Phosphate esters and chlorinated diphenyls have very low-flammability characteristics, and this has led to their wide use where critical fire-risk situations occur, such as in aviation and coal mining. Their overall properties are mediocre, but are sufficiently good for use where fire resistance is particularly important. Other synthetic fluids such as silicones, chlorinated silicones, fluorinated silicones, fluorinated hydrocarbon, and polyphenyl ethers are all used in relatively small quantities for their high-temperature stability, but all are inferior lubricants and very expensive compared with mineral oils. Several types of water-containing fluid are used in large quantities, and these are listed in Table 20.7. They are used almost entirely to provide either fire resistance or superior cooling. Mineral oils can be considered as the normal, conventional oils, and alternative types are used only when they can offer some particular advantage over mineral oils. Table 20.8 summarizes the selection of oil type in relation to the special properties required. It is difficult to give precise high-temperature limits for the use of specific oil types, because the limiting temperature depends on the required life and the amount of degradation which is acceptable. Even for water-containing lubricants, the upper temperature limit may be from 50 to 85 C depending on the required life, the degree of ventilation, and the amount of water loss which is acceptable. Table 20.9 summarizes the temperature limits for a few synthetic oils, but the limits shown should be considered only approximate. Serious incompatibility problems can occur with lubricating oils, especially with nonmetallic materials such as rubber seals and hoses. Table 20.10 lists some satisfactory and unsatisfactory materials for use with various lubricants.
EAN-13 Generator In .NET Framework
Using Barcode encoder for ASP.NET Control to generate, create EAN 13 image in ASP.NET applications.
Generate UPC - 13 In .NET Framework
Using Barcode encoder for .NET framework Control to generate, create EAN13 image in .NET applications.
TABLE 20.7 Some Water-Containing Lubricants
EAN-13 Supplement 5 Maker In VB.NET
Using Barcode printer for .NET Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
UPCA Creator In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in Software applications.
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Generating EAN / UCC - 14 In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 14 image in Software applications.
Code-39 Printer In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in Software applications.
LUBRICATION 20.17
Encoding Code 128 Code Set B In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create Code-128 image in Software applications.
Bar Code Encoder In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
LUBRICATION
Leitcode Maker In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create Leitcode image in Software applications.
GS1 128 Drawer In None
Using Barcode drawer for Online Control to generate, create UCC-128 image in Online applications.
TABLE 20.8 Choice of Oil Type for Specific Properties
Printing Barcode In .NET
Using Barcode drawer for Reporting Service Control to generate, create bar code image in Reporting Service applications.
Bar Code Printer In Objective-C
Using Barcode creation for iPhone Control to generate, create barcode image in iPhone applications.
20.8 LUBRICATING GREASES
European Article Number 13 Creator In None
Using Barcode generator for Office Excel Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in Excel applications.
Generating 2D Barcode In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Matrix Barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
Lubricating greases are not simply very viscous oils. They consist of lubricating oils, often of quite low viscosity, which have been thickened by means of finely dispersed solids called thickeners. The effect of the thickeners is to produce a semirigid structure in which the dispersion of thickener particles is stabilized by electric charges. The liquid phase is firmly held by a combination of opposite electric charges, adsorpTABLE 20.9 Range of Temperature Limits in Degrees Celsius for Some Synthetic Oils as a Function of the Required Life
Code 39 Full ASCII Creator In Objective-C
Using Barcode drawer for iPad Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in iPad applications.
Creating Linear Barcode In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode creator for VS .NET Control to generate, create 1D Barcode image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
LUBRICATION 20.18
BEARINGS AND LUBRICATION
TABLE 20.10 Some Compatible and Incompatible Materials for Different Oil Types
tion, and mechanical trapping. As a result, the whole grease behaves as a more or less soft solid, and there is only a very slight tendency for the oil to flow out of the grease. Greases can probably be made from any type of lubricating oil, but in practice the majority are based on mineral oils, and only a few other base oils are of any real importance. Diesters have been used to produce greases for higher and lower temperatures than greases based on mineral oils are suitable for. Silicones are used for higher temperatures again, and fluorinated hydrocarbons for even higher temperatures; both these types are also used because of their chemical inertness, but the total quantities are relatively small. Phosphate esters have been used for fire resistance, and vegetable oils for compatibility with foodstuffs; but, again, the quantities are very small. The most commonly used thickeners are soaps, which are salts of organic acids with calcium, sodium, lithium, or aluminum. The soaps take the form of fibrous particles which interlock to give a high level of stiffness at low soap concentrations. Many other substances which have been used as grease thickeners tend to be more spherical and have to be used at higher concentrations than soaps to achieve the same degree of thickening. Most of the additives used in lubricating oils are also effective in greases. And some, such as the solid lubricants graphite and molybdenum disulfide, are much more effective in greases than in oils. Table 20.11 lists some of the many different components which may be used in greases. The possible combinations of these components, and their different proportions, lead to an infinite range of grease formulations. In practice, a typical grease consists of a mineral oil in which are dispersed about 10 percent of a soap thickener, about 1 percent of antioxidant, and small amounts of other additives such as corrosion inhibitors, antiwear or extreme-pressure agents, and structure modifiers. The most important physical characteristic of a grease is its relative hardness or softness, which is called consistency. Consistency is assessed by measuring the dis-
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.