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(c) (d)
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FIGURE 22.17 Ways to improve the fatigue life of bolts. (a) Use collars to increase the length-todiameter ratio of the bolts; (b) turn down the body of a bolt to reduce its stiffness; (c) make sure that there are at least three threads above and below a nut to reduce thread stress concentrations; (d) it also helps to avoid the situation, shown here, where thread run-out coincides with a shear plane in the joint, or (e) to use spherical washers to help a bolt adjust to bending loads, or (f ) to use tension nuts to reduce thread stress levels. All figures shown are improvements except (d).
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them, and if possible, roll them after heat treatment instead of before [22.12]. Use a large root radius in the threads. Use a large head-to-body fillet, and use elliptical fillets instead of round fillets [22.13]. Use spherical washers to minimize bending effects (Fig. 22.17e). Use Class 2 threads instead of Class 3. Use tension nuts for a smoother stress transition in the bolts (Fig. 22.17f). Use nuts that are longer than normal. Make sure the thread-tobody run-out is smooth and gradual.
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Figure 22.18 shows the flowchart of a computer program which might be used to design bolted joints loaded in tension. We start by entering dimensions, strengths, external loads, and the like. Next, we compute the cross-sectional areas of the bolt and the stiffness of bolt and joint members.The program assumes that the joint is not gasketed. Next, we compute the maximum acceptable tension in the bolt, basing this either on a code or specification limit or on the yield strength of the bolt. If the bolts are to see a combination of tension and shear loads, the acceptable upper limit of tension must, of course, be reduced. The next step is to determine the acceptable lower limit on the clamping force in the joint. This will usually be a more complicated procedure than suggested by the flowchart. If gaskets are involved, for example, it would be necessary to calculate minimum clamping force using the procedures and equations of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, or the like. If all we are concerned about is transverse slip or total separation, we could use the equations shown in the flowchart. We complete the definition of our design specifications by computing a target preload and then printing out the upper and lower acceptable limits, the force required to yield the bolt, and the target preload. It is useful to know these things if we need to revise the target preload at a later point in the program. Having determined the acceptable upper and lower limits, we now take a series of steps to estimate the actual limits we will achieve in practice based on our target preload and estimates of such things as tool scatter and joint relaxation. During this part of the procedure we also introduce the estimated effects of the external tension loads on the joint, assuming linear joint behavior. The equations used here are derived from the joint diagram in Fig. 22.13. We compute the anticipated upper limit on bolt tension first, and then we compute the anticipated lower limit on clamping force. We compare them, one at a time, to the acceptable limits. We recycle, choosing a new target preload, if the anticipated limits fall outside of the acceptable limits. In some cases we will not be able to satisfy our specifications merely by modifying the target preload; we may have to choose new joint dimensions to enlarge the range between upper and lower limits or choose more accurate tools to reduce the range between the upper and lower limits anticipated in practice. When our conditions are satisfied, we complete the program by computing the torque required to aim for the target preload. Then we print out the final values of the parameters computed.
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Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
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