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require the selection of a material that is less resistant to dry fatigue than is the best bearing material, and this applies especially to two-layer bearing materials. In all these examples a study of acceptable modes of wear may result in a different selection of material than if the goal were simply to minimize wear.
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34.4.6 Testing Materials Finally, it is necessary to consider the possibility of testing candidate materials in bench tests or in prototypes. After some study of worn parts from a device or machine that most nearly approximates the new or improved product, one of several conclusions could be reached: 1. The same design and materials in the wearing parts of the example device will perform adequately in the redesign, in terms of function, cost, and all other attributes. 2. A slight change in size, lubrication, or cooling of the example parts will be adequate for the design. 3. A significant change in size, lubrication, or cooling of the example parts will be necessary for the redesign. 4. A different material will be needed in the redesign. The action to be taken after reaching one of the preceding conclusions will vary. The first conclusion can reasonably be followed by production of a few copies of the redesign. These should be tested and minor adjustments made to ensure adequate product life. The second conclusion should be followed by cautious action, and the third conclusion should invoke the building and exhaustive testing of a prototype of the redesign. The fourth conclusion may require tests in bench-test devices in conjunction with prototypes. It is usually costly and fruitless to purchase bench-test machinery and launch into testing of materials or lubricants without experience and preparation. It is doubly futile for the novice to run accelerated wear tests with either bench tests, prototypes, or production parts. Experience shows time after time that simple wear tests complicate the prediction of product life. The problem is correlation. For example, automotive company engineers have repeatedly found that engines on dynamometers must be run in a completely unpredictable manner to achieve the same type of wear as seen in engines of cars in suburban service. Engines turned by electric motors, though heated, wear very differently from fired engines. Separate components such as a valve train can be made to wear in a separate test rig nearly the same way as in a fired engine, with some effort, but cam materials rubbing against valve-lifter materials in a bench test inevitably produce very different results from those in a valve-train test rig. Most machines and products are simpler than engines, but the principles of wear testing are the same; namely, the wear mechanisms must be very similar in each of the production designs, the prototype test, the subcomponent test, and the bench test. The wear rate of each test in the hierarchy should be similar, the worn surfaces must be nearly identical, and the transferred and loose wear debris should contain the same range of particle sizes, shapes, and composition. Thus it is seen that the prototype, subcomponent, and bench tests must be designed to correlate with the wear results of the final product. This requires considerable experience and confidence where the final product is not yet available. This is the reason for studying the worn
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Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
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parts of a product nearest to the redesign and a good reason for retaining resident wear expertise in every engineering group. A clear indication of the problem with bench tests may be seen in some results with three test devices. These are: 1. Pin-V test in which a 1 4-in-diameter pin of AISI 3135 steel rotates at 200 rpm with four-line contact provided by two V blocks made of AISI 1137 steel. 2. Block-on-ring test where a rectangular block of a chosen steel slides on the outer (OD) surface of a ring of hard case-carburized AISI 4620 steel. 3. The four-ball test where a ball rotates in contact with three stationary balls, all of hardened AISI 52100 steel. The four-ball test and the ring-on-block test were run over a range of applied loads and speeds. The pin-V test was run over a range of loads only. All tests were run continuously, that is, not in an oscillating or stop-start sequence mode. All tests were run with several lubricants. Results from the ring-block test were not sufficiently reproducible or consistent for reliable analysis. Results from the other two tests were adequate for the formulation of a wear equation from each, as follows: Pin-V test: Four-ball test: Wear rate (load)2 Wear rate (load)4.75 (speed)2.5
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These results may be compared with linear laws of wear discussed frequently in the literature, which would be of the form Linear law: Wear rate (load)1.0 (speed)1.0
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There are several points about the usefulness of published wear data to be derived from these results: 1. Practical wear rates are probably not linear in any parameter or variable of operation. 2. If three standard wear tests respond differently to changes in load and speed, then a practical part will probably respond differently again. Furthermore, an accelerated test with a standard wear tester will likely be misleading, since the influence of doubling load or speed would most likely be different between the test device and the product. In fact, the effect of variation in load and speed produces very irregular results with the block-on-ring test machine, which renders extrapolated values of tests useless. 3. It is not known whether the different results from the three wear testers are due to the use of different specimen materials or different specimen shapes or both. Thus rank ordering of materials from wear tests is likely to change among test devices and different testing conditions. The point of the preceding discussion is that wear testing of materials and components must be done, but it must be done carefully. Testing should be done by experienced engineers and with a strong insistence upon close analysis of worn surfaces and wear debris. It would be useful to be able to compare one s observations with a large and comprehensive atlas of photographs of surfaces in various
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