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Dimension Design
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The decision to use a hierarchy bridge, or not to use one, is important. It will have impacts in a variety of areas and requires evaluation by a group of team members representing different functions. To participate in such a decision, it is important to understand the options fully.
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Recursive Hierarchies
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In 7, you learned about attribute hierarchies. This term describes relationships between columns in a dimension table. The attributes of a typical product dimension table illustrate this concept: each product falls within a brand, each brand falls within a category. A dimensional design does not separate the levels of an attribute hierarchy into separate tables, but any level can easily be used to filter or group the facts. Some hierarchies cannot be defined in this manner. When there is a relationship between particular rows of a dimension, rather than attributes, there is an instance hierarchy. This kind of hierarchy is said to be recursive, because each instance may refer to another. A recursive hierarchy is hard to represent in a single table without compromising the analytic possibilities. Contrary to popular opinion, this holds true whether the hierarchy has a fixed number of levels (balanced) or not (unbalanced).
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An instance hierarchy is a set of relationships among the individual rows of a table. The word instance refers to the data in a specific row. The simplest example of an instance hierarchy is a self-referring relationship. In an entity-relationship design, a self-referring relationship is one where each row of a table may directly refer to another row in the same table. Not all instance hierarchies involve direct self-reference, but this example will illustrate the key challenge. An example of a self-referring relationship in an entity-relationship model appears in Figure 10-1. This diagram suggests that any given company may have a parent company. Unlike an attribute hierarchy, it is not possible to describe this relationship using the attributes of the entity in question a company, in this case. With the product attribute hierarchy, we were able to say products fall within brands; brands fall within categories. In the company instance hierarchy, we cannot use attributes to describe the hierarchy. All we can say is that companies may be owned by other companies. One instance of a thing refers to another instance of the same kind of thing.
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COMPANY company_id company_name . . . parent_company_id Recursive Relationship: Each company may have a parent company.
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Figure 10-1
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A self-referential relationship
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10 Recursive Hierarchies and Bridges 221
At first glance, you might not recognize the illustration in Figure 10-1 as a hierarchy. It appears to be a single table. However, the pig s ear is a recursive relationship. This relationship can be read in two directions: each company may have a parent, and each company may have one or more 2 5 children. When you trace through these nested relationships, a hierarchy emerges. One company may own several others, each of which in turn owns still others. 3 4 6 For example, Figure 10-2 shows a set of relationships among companies that can be traced back to one particular company, called Company 1. Notice that this hierarchy has an indefinite number of levels. Four levels are present in 7 8 the example, with Company 1 at the top. There is no Figure 10-2 Companies under guarantee that all companies will participate in ownership Company 1 structures with four levels. Other top-level companies may sit atop hierarchies that are shallower or deeper. Even beneath Company 1, not all branches of this hierarchy have the same number of levels. A hierarchy like this one is variously referred to as an unbalanced hierarchy or a variabledepth hierarchy. Examples of other instance hierarchies that exhibit these characteristics include a parts breakdown structure (part assemblies composed of other part assemblies), departmental ownership (departments made up of other departments), reporting structures (employees reporting to other employees), and some geographical systems (regions falling within other regions).
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