barcode vb.net 2010 PART VI in Software

Creator QR-Code in Software PART VI

PART VI
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Tools and Documentation
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addressed by controlling who has the ability to build certain kinds of queries, and planning for report development resources accordingly.
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Business Intelligence and SQL Generation
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While report developers are usually capable of writing SQL queries, most reporting tools for relational data do not require them to do so. These tools allow a user to specify what information is desired, and then generate SQL accordingly. They can be tremendously valuable parts of the data warehouse architecture, opening the report creation process to technical and nontechnical users alike, while ensuring proper and consistent use of the dimensional model. Leveraging SQL generation capability requires some degree of advance configuration. It is important to recognize that no SQL generator will be able to produce the same range of queries as a skilled developer.
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SQL Generators
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Many commercial products allow developers to design reports, charts, or dashboard widgets that present information from a relational database. Most of these tools are capable of generating queries for the developer. They vary in sophistication from a simple schemabased framework to a more sophisticated semantic layer. What these tools share in common is an ability to take predefined information about the database schema and use it to autogenerate SQL.
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Schema-Driven SQL Generators
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The most basic example of a query-generating tool works by allowing a developer to graphically specify the tables in a query, and the joins that relate them. This framework can then be used as the basis of a report. Columns are dragged from the graphical depiction of the schema onto a layout canvas. As the developer does this, the tool automatically constructs the appropriate SQL. Figure 16-1 depicts an example of how this works. This illustration captures common components of a simple reporting tool s interface: 1. The report developer uses the top portion of the window to identify the tables and joins that will be used. 2. The developer can drag specific column names from this framework onto a canvas that is used to lay out a report. 3. Based on what the developer has added to the canvas, and the information about the tables and joins, the tool generates an SQL query. This is the essence of how a reporting tool generates SQL. Specific tools, of course, have their own interface formats and processes, but the underlying concept remains the same.
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Query Generators and Semantic Layers
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Some business intelligence tools take this process a step further, adding a business view of information on top of the technical view. The business view is a representation of things available to report on. It is the only view made available to users or report developers for
16 Design and Business Intelligence 371
Tables and Joins DAY 1 day_key full_date month month_number year . . . ORDER_FACTS day_key product_key salesrep_key customer_key order_dollars . . . PRODUCT
SALESREP
CUSTOMER
Canvas Header:
YEAR {year}
MONTH {month} {month} {month}
SUM OF
ORDER_DOLLARS {sum of order_dollars} {sum of order_dollars} {sum of order_dollars}
Body:
{year} {year}
Footer:
Query SQL 3 SELECT day.year, day.month, sum(order_facts.order_dollars) FROM day, order_facts,
Figure 16-1
A reporting tool generates SQL
dragging elements onto a canvas. Behind the scenes, an architect has tied the business view of information to the database schema, and identified the tables and joins. The concept of a business view that is mapped to physical structures is called a semantic layer. It allows a user or developer to build a report without any knowledge of the underlying database. Pioneered and patented by Business Objects (now a part of SAP AG), this concept is now employed by numerous commercial products. Figure 16-2 depicts an example of a semantic layer. This is not a picture of a particular product or tool, but rather a generalization of the essential elements involved.
Part VI
PART VI
Tools and Documentation
Tables / Columns / Joins
PRODUCT DAY day_key full_date month month_number year . . . ORDER_FACTS day_key product_key salesrep_key customer_key order_dollars . . . SALESREP
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